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Thread: Grammar

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    #1

    Grammar

    Critics praised the word as hightly original.

    I.In the structure of "praise sth as sth", the "as" is a prep., adj. or adv.?

    II. If the "as" only can be ued as a prep in the structure, what the structure of the black is?

    Please.


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    #2

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Critics praised the word as hightly original.

    I.In the structure of "praise sth as sth", the "as" is a prep., adj. or adv.?

    II. If the "as" only can be ued as a prep in the structure, what the structure of the black is?

    Please.
    I believe 'as' is a preposition. The structure in question is the predicative part of the complex object 'the word as highly original'. ('the word' is the nominal part of the complex)

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    #3

    Re: Grammar

    According to the dictionary, it must be "praise sth as sth". So, "as" in this case must be a prep, which should be followed by nouns. obviously,"highly original" is not. Is there any rules that prep.could be followed by adv., or adj.


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    #4

    Re: Grammar

    the noun is 'understood' to be there:
    Critics praised the word as (being a) highly original term/word/name/expression/designation/appellation.


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    #5

    Re: Grammar

    Here is another very commonly used pattern, where 'as' is not followed by a noun either: 'as soon as possible'.

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    #6

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Here is another very commonly used pattern, where 'as' is not followed by a noun either: 'as soon as possible'.
    Ah, yes;however, as has more than one functions: as...as is a comparative structure.

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    #7

    Re: Grammar

    David L.Re: Grammar
    the noun is 'understood' to be there:
    Critics praised the word as (being a) highly original term/word/name/expression/designation/appellation.

    "being a" and "term/word/name/expression/designation/appellation" could be omitted in such case? Is it fomal?


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    #8

    Re: Grammar

    As I said, the words I added are 'understood' to be there, but are not written or said.

    Here is another very commonly used pattern, where 'as' is not followed by a noun either: 'as soon as possible'.

    "...as soon as (it/the task/the job/the errand is) possible (for you to do.)

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    #9

    Re: Grammar

    Critics praised the word as hightly original.

    So, this sentence is definitely correct. Right?

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    #10

    Re: Grammar

    Quote Originally Posted by puzzle View Post
    Critics praised the word as hightly original.

    So, this sentence is definitely correct. Right?
    The syntax is correct, yes; however, shouldn't hightly be highly?

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