Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #1

    bla di bla

    Hi

    What does this phrase mean? I tried to look it up in a dictionary but couldn't find anything.

    This is not the usual bla-di-bla. Please read these – we’ve kept them as short and accessible as possible. If a certain ..........

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,215
    #2

    Re: bla di bla

    I've never seen "blah-di-bla" but I have seen "blah blah blah."

    It means that this will be more interesting, more on-topic, more appropriate than the usual stuff, assuming the usual stuff is boring or full of jargon.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Sweden

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 1,638
    #3

    Re: bla di bla

    Hi

    If bla di bla means the same as blah blah blah, then I know what it means :)

  2. buggles's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 3,987
    #4

    Re: bla di bla

    Bla di bla is reasonably common usage and means the hum-drum everyday stuff that everyone is familiar with.

    "No more bla di bla, let's get right to the point."

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: bla di bla

    Quote Originally Posted by buggles View Post
    Bla di bla is reasonably common usage and means the hum-drum everyday stuff that everyone is familiar with.

    "No more bla di bla, let's get right to the point."
    Maybe it's Br English. Perhaps I'm being fanciful (I have a heated imagination in some cases ) but I suspect the influence of the rhyming 'Mardi Gras' - showy and synthetic and noisy and superficial... [But maybe not, as that festival and the associated procession is typical of New Orleans, which doesn't suggest a British derivation].

    b

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •