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  1. Noego's Avatar
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    #1

    Grool

    Hello,

    What is the meaning of "grool" in the following sentence:

    The other two grools nearly had hysterics when we did. I certainly must've been very hard up to even bother with any of them.

    I can't find it anywhere in my dictionaries.

    Thank you for your answers.

  2. beascarpetta's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Grool

    Quote Originally Posted by Noego View Post
    Hello,

    What is the meaning of "grool" in the following sentence:

    The other two grools nearly had hysterics when we did. I certainly must've been very hard up to even bother with any of them.

    I can't find it anywhere in my dictionaries.

    Thank you for your answers.
    it's taken from Salinger's "Catcher in the Rye", isn't it?

    have a look here for an explanation
    hope this helps.


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    #3

    Re: Grool

    I think it is a reference to creatures in the computer game GROOLS, picture of which attached. It is a derogatory description of the girls. As the quote says, "I must have been very hard up to even bother with them."
    (thank you Snowcake - my first uploaded image!)
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails grool.jpg  
    Last edited by David L.; 17-May-2008 at 08:14.

  3. Noego's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Grool

    Thanks to both of you.

    Yes you are correct. This is indeed from the ''Cather in the Rye''

    But David, about the computer game, I'm not so sure.

    It's just that the story takes place in the 1950's, I'm not sure how advanced computer games were at the time.

    What do you think?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Grool

    Quote Originally Posted by Noego View Post
    Thanks to both of you.

    Yes you are correct. This is indeed from the ''Cather in the Rye''

    But David, about the computer game, I'm not so sure.

    It's just that the story takes place in the 1950's, I'm not sure how advanced computer games were at the time.

    What do you think?
    I don't know the computer game that David L refers to but wouldn't it seem logical that the creator of the game 'borrowed' the word from Salinger?


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    #6

    Re: Grool

    Anachronistic at least!
    From the sense of the sentence, 'grool' is a derogatory word.
    I wonder if a grool is some ugly mythological creature, like a troll, that both authors draw from?

  5. Noego's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Grool

    How about this:

    I think, in context, Holden is referring to a pair of girls he doesn't
    find particularly attractive, and they happen to be laughing at him at the
    moment. He hasn't been drinking, so he's not slurring his speech. He's
    probably crossing "girls" with either "ghouls" or "drools" to reflect his
    distaste for these women.
    from the link provided by Beascapperta.


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    #8

    Re: Grool

    I've tracked down this:
    Glossary :Catcher in the Rye

    • pimpy-looking
    resembling a man who is an agent for a prostitute or prostitutes and lives off their earnings.
    • from hunger
    here, unattractive, unfashionable.
    • grool
    here, an unattractive person.

    • Peter Lorre
    (1904–1964) Hungarian by birth, he was a recognizable character actor and movie star in several countries, including the United States.
    • Stork Club or El Morocco
    fashionable New York City nightclubs, where one was more likely to spot celebrities.
    • Tom Collins
    an iced drink made with gin, mixed with soda water, lime or lemon juice, and sugar; typically a summer drink.
    • Radio City Music Hall
    a Manhattan theater featuring films and stage shows, including a lavish Christmas pageant.

    ...but still trying to reference the origin of the word.

  6. Noego's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Grool

    Hello,

    Where did you find this information, if I may ask?

    It looks very promising.


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    #10

    Re: Grool


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