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  1. Dmitry7
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    #1

    "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    Hello!
    I'm reading the article here
    One in three back carrying knives | UK news | The Observer
    and can't translate the headline.
    What the "back" means?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    Quote Originally Posted by Dmitry7 View Post
    Hello!
    I'm reading the article here
    One in three back carrying knives | UK news | The Observer
    and can't translate the headline.
    What the "back" means?
    I haven't read the article word for word, but I didn't spot an explicit mention of some historical statistic. But I imagine that's what the 'back' means - Many people have reverted to carrying knives. [And, knowing the Observer, I would imagine that the sub-text is "The streets of London are as dangerous today as they were in the days of Jack the Ripper - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia " (that's the force of 'back' - "I don't know what's happening to this country...") ]


    b

  3. Kraken's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    By the context, I guess it could mean support as in "back up".

    "One in three young people living in cities thinks it is acceptable to carry a knife in self-defence(...)"

    But then the headline sholud be "One in three BACKS carrying knives"...

    Maybe there's a typo there... but that's only my opinion.
    Last edited by Kraken; 19-May-2008 at 16:18. Reason: typo

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    - as far as the interpretation goes. I think of our two - diametrically opposed - interpretations, Krakens is much the more likely. If you go to the Observer page and click on the 'Focus' link you'll see that many of the young men interviewed 'back' carrying knives.

    I wouldn't get too hot under the collar about "back/backs" though. Different strokes for different folks.

    b

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    #5

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    Thank you for your answers!
    I have another two questions about the same article.

    I don't understand the meaning of 'would':

    It found 30 per cent said it was acceptable sometimes to carry a knife while 23 per cent would use one.
    23 per cent want to carry knives (but now they don't carry them)? Or they had carried them? And why 'use one' not 'carry one'?

    A third admitted that fear of gun and knife crime affected where they went out socially while 34 per cent believed that they would witness a knife attack.
    23 per cent had seen a knife attack? Or they believe they will see it?


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    #6

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    Quote Originally Posted by dimkin7 View Post
    Thank you for your answers!
    I have another two questions about the same article.

    I don't understand the meaning of 'would':

    It found 30 per cent said it was acceptable sometimes to carry a knife while 23 per cent would use one.

    23 per cent want to carry knives (but now they don't carry them)? Or they had carried them? And why 'use one' not 'carry one'?

    Neither. Of the sample questioned, 23% were prepared to use a knife in an aggressive way.



    A third admitted that fear of gun and knife crime affected where they went out socially while 34 per cent believed that they would witness a knife attack

    23 per cent had seen a knife attack? Or they believe they will see it? Will probably at some time see an attack.

    .

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "One in three back carrying knives" - how to translate?

    To pick up a point in Anglika's reply: the two "would"s are different.

    1. "It found 30 per cent said it was acceptable sometimes to carry a knife while 23 per cent would use one." Conditional - what the respondents said was something like 'If I had to, I'd use one.'

    2 "A third admitted that fear of gun and knife crime affected where they went out socially while 34 per cent believed that they would witness a knife attack". Reported speech - what the respondents said was something like 'I'll probably see someone getting knifed'. (This "would" could be a conditional as well: 'If I went in that part of town after dark I'd probably see a knifing." As so often with "would", you have to be attentive to the context - especially in newspaper reports of surveys .)

    b

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