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    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #1

    Some questions

    1) I encountered this sentence in Harry Potter:
    "There was a great road from the motorbike and Harry felt the sidecar give a nasty lurch"
    Why give can go with felt here?

    2) In my SAT preparation, I encounter this problem:
    "The whopping crane population has increased from only 15 to about 2 hundred, which is one of conservation's most encouraging stories
    A) which is one of conservation's most encouraging stories
    b) which is one of the most encouraging stories in conservation
    c) and this one of conservation's most encouraging stories
    d) and this growth is one of conservation's most encouraging stories
    E) and that appears to be encouraging to conservationists

    The answer is D. But I don't still get it, which stand after a comma can subtitute for the clause which comes before it, why can't it be the correct answer here? And the answer book also says that: The act of changing which to this does not solve the problem of a pronoun's lack of specific antecedent. I don't get the whole thing

    3) I came in 15 minutes late which made the whole class difficult to understand
    A) I came in 15 mintues late, and this
    B) coming in fifteen minutes late

    B is the correct answer. But why not a? They say: The pronounce "which" has no specific antecedent here, and the change of which to this does not correct the problem.... Why???

  1. #2

    Smile Re: Some questions

    Belly, I'll give you my answer to (1). Then maybe someone else can help with the others:

    In fact, 'Harry felt the sidecare lurch nastily' would have been fine. But the author has decided to emphasize the movement. In so doing, to use the word 'give' also implies that the sidecar was not just an inanimate irrelevance: a technique that I believe many authors use.

    SB

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Some questions

    1) to give, to yield somewhat when subjected to weight, force, pressure, etc.: A horsehair mattress doesn't give much.

    2) Focus on the meaning here, not on the structure:
    population has increased from only 15 to about 2 hundred, and this growth is one of conservation's most encouraging stories.
    3) In B. a gerund phrase functions as the subject,
    B. (My) coming in late made the whole class difficult to understand.
    In A. I came in 15 minutes late is repeated by the pronoun this:
    A. I came in 15 minutes late, and this (coming in late) made the whole class difficult to understand.
    Which of the two, B or A is more economical/efficient?



    • Join Date: Jul 2007
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    #4

    Re: Some questions

    I'm sorry, but it has to be "gave", doesn't it?

  3. #5

    Smile Re: Some questions

    No, the tense has already been determined by 'felt'. You could also say: 'I saw the man taking the money, then driving off.

    SB

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    #6

    Re: Some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by belly_ttt View Post
    I'm sorry, but it has to be "gave", doesn't it?
    In addition, there's a rule in English that says that only the main verb carries tense. The main and tense-carrying verb in our example is 'felt':
    Ex: Harry felt the sidecar givea nasty lurch.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #7

    Re: Some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Shakespeare's brother View Post
    No, the tense has already been determined by 'felt'. You could also say: 'I saw the man taking the money, then driving off.

    SB
    I have a question regarding this sentence. How different would the real picture be if we were to use infinitives to indicate the succession of actions?

    I saw the man take the money and drive off.

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    #8

    Re: Some questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    How different would the real picture be if we were to use infinitives to indicate the succession of actions?

    I saw the man take the money and drive off.
    I don't understand your question. What do you mean by 'real picture'?


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #9

    Re: Some questions

    Events taking place in real life.

  6. #10

    Smile Re: Some questions

    Clark, I don't think that using your phrase would change the events in our minds' eye. What you have written would be an adequate and fluent alternative to my suggestion.

    SB

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