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    #1

    "in" or "at"

    Hi!

    Please check if the usage of "in" or "at" is correct?

    1) The cargo is discharging at Jeddah.
    2) Your ship will be berthing at Berth no. 30 soonest she arrives in Jeddah.

    Thanks,

    Willy

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "in" or "at"

    Quote Originally Posted by wiljed View Post
    Hi!

    Please check if the usage of "in" or "at" is correct?

    1) The cargo is discharging at Jeddah.
    2) Your ship will be berthing at Berth no. 30 soonest she arrives in Jeddah.

    Thanks,

    Willy
    The use of pronouns is fine. The word 'discharging' is surprising - although maybe it would fit in a context where drums of corrosive chemicals started leaking the moment they arrived at Jedda! Instead of 1 you could say 'the cargo will be unloaded at Jedda', or - informally (the active usage is not strictly accurate, but it is current) 'The ship unloads at Jedda'.

    b

  2. Kraken's Avatar

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    #3

    Re: "in" or "at"

    soonest she arrives in Jeddah.
    Is that correct? I have never seen "soonest" with that meaning.
    I would have said "as soon as she arrives in Jeddah".

    Thank you.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "in" or "at"

    Quote Originally Posted by Kraken View Post
    Is that correct? I have never seen "soonest" with that meaning.
    I would have said "as soon as she arrives in Jeddah".

    Thank you.
    Yes - I missed that.

    But... "soonest" used to be used in telegrams, before there was e-mail or SMS, or the more recent abbreviation 'asap' - "Seasonal figures require attention soonest". From being a telegraphese adverb, "soonest" started being used as an attributive adjective meaning "earliest": "The seasonal figures require your soonest attention". This sort of rather archaic business-speak seems to have lasted longer in some parts of the world (India, for example); 'as soonest she arrives in Jeddah' is still wrong, but the persistence of this archaic usage of "soonest" might explain why 'as soon as' was misheard.

    b

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