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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    use of word

    though,although, despite, and inspite. After my gratitude to you i would like you to clarify how am I use these words

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    #2

    Re: use of word

    Quote Originally Posted by ahmed adam View Post
    though,although, despite, and inspite. After my gratitude to you i would like you to clarify how am I use these words
    Although is normally used at the beginning of a sentence or clause:

    Although he didn't have any money, he called a taxi. (Though could also be used here.)

    "I will call a taxi. I don't know where to find one, though."

    The above example uses though as an alternative to but, placed at the end of the sentence instead of the beginning: "I will call a taxi but I don't know where to find one."

    Despite on its own must be followed by a noun, verb participle or gerund:

    Despite the rain, he went outside.
    Despite going out in the rain, he didn't get wet.

    In spite (two words) has much the same meaning and use, but is always followed by of:

    In spite of the rain, he went outside.

    Hope these examples help.

    Dave

  1. banderas's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: use of word

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post

    Despite on its own must be followed by a noun, verb participle or gerund:

    Despite the rain, he went outside.
    Despite going out in the rain, he didn't get wet.

    In spite (two words) has much the same meaning and use, but is always followed by of:

    In spite of the rain, he went outside.

    Dave
    Hi, Dave,
    when would you be more inclined to use "despite" than "in spite of"? Are they absolutely interchangeable?

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    #4

    Re: use of word

    Hi Banderas.

    Good point.

    I consider in spite of to be a little stronger than despite.

    Despite the rain suggests to me that the person venturing outside was almost unaware that it was raining.

    In spite of the rain suggests awareness of the rain and its associated discomfort, but the person made a conscious effort to go out nonetheless.

    That's not a dictionary definition, but my own feeling.

    Dave

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    #5

    Re: use of word

    Attention: I’m not a teacher.

    Hi ahmed adam,

    Situation:

    Last year Jack and Jill spent their vacation at the beach.
    It rained a lot, but they enjoyed themselves. You can say:
    Although it rained a lot, they enjoyed themselves. (= It rained a lot, but they enjoyed themselves.)
    In spite of the rain, they enjoyed themselves.
    Despite the rain, they enjoyed themselves.
    After although, we use a subject + verb:
    Although she smokes 20 cigarettes a day, she seems quite healthy.
    Although it rained a lot, we enjoyed our vacation.
    I didn’t get the job, although I had all the necessary qualifications.
    After “in spite of” (or despit) we use a noun, a pronoun (this, that, what, etc.) or –ing.
    In spite of the rain, we enjoyed our vacation.
    I didn’t get the job, despite my qualifications.
    She wasn’t well, but in spite of this she went to work.
    Despite what I said last night, I still love you.
    I’m not tired, in spite of working hard all day.

    Note that we say “in spite of”, but “despite” (without of).
    You can also say in spite of/ despite the fact that…
    In spite of the fact that I was tired, I couldn’t sleep.
    She seems healthy, despite being very tired.
    Compaire although and in spite of / despite:
    Although the traffic was bad, I arrived on time.
    In spite of the traffic, I arrived on time.
    I couldn’t sleep, although I was very tired.
    I couldn’t sleep, despite being very tired.
    Sometimes we use though instead of although.
    I didn’t get the job, though I had all the necessary qualifications.
    In spoken English we often use though at the end of a sentence:
    The house isn’t very nice. I like the garden though. (=but I like the garden)
    I see him every day. I’ve never spoken to him though. (=but I’ve never spoken to him)
    Even though is a stronger form of although.
    Even though I was really tired, I couldn’t sleep.

    Regards.

    V.


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    #6

    Re: use of word

    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Mortimer View Post
    Although is normally used at the beginning of a sentence or clause:

    I have to confess I was taken aback by this, although perhaps I should not have been.

    So far as I am aware, it can be used within a sentence or clause, and maybe the instruction should be that you do not generally use "Though" at the beginning of a sentence; "Although" is the preferred form.

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