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    #1

    beside/besides

    Hi
    Can I say:

    Besides, I always felt I would succeed.

    instead of

    Besides this, I always felt I would succeed.

    Is there any difference between the two sentences?

    Thank you very much in advance.

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    #2

    Re: beside/besides

    Quote Originally Posted by Teia View Post
    Hi
    Can I say:

    Besides, I always felt I would succeed.

    instead of

    Besides this, I always felt I would succeed.

    Is there any difference between the two sentences?

    Thank you very much in advance.
    Your first example is correct: besides means apart from anything or moreover or anyway.

    Once you introduce a noun or pronoun to follow besides, the s is omitted as the meaning is slightly different:

    My bed is beside the window.
    I am beside myself with grief (a figure of speech)

    Dave

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    #3

    Re: beside/besides

    Besides-in addition
    Besides, I always felt I would succeed.-correct.
    Last edited by rj1948; 21-May-2008 at 16:30.


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    #4

    Re: beside/besides

    Once you introduce a noun or pronoun to follow besides, the s is omitted as the meaning is slightly different:

    My bed is beside the window.
    I am beside myself with grief (a figure of speech)


    Highlighted region:
    However:
    'beside the cold meat, there are platters of trout and salmon' means either ‘the cold meat is next to the trout and salmon’ or ‘apart from the cold meat, there are also trout and salmon’. Hence, this rule applies only to one meaning, and is really pointing to the intrinsic difference between the two forms.

    besides
    preposition
    in addition to; apart from : 'I have no other family besides my parents' "Besides being a player, he was my friend.'

    adverb
    in addition; as well : 'I'm capable of doing the work, and a lot more besides.'
    • moreover; anyway : 'I had no time to warn you. Besides, I wasn't sure.'

    So, Teia
    Besides this, I always felt I would succeed.
    Is there any difference between the two sentences?

    'this' is the pronoun, so 'besides' would have to be being used as a preposition meaning, 'in addition to, but quite apart from (something) else.'
    So then it would depend on the sentence that preceded.
    What sentence would you use before 'besides, this, I always felt I..."?

    Post that, and we can discuss it further.

  1. banderas's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: beside/besides

    Quote Originally Posted by Teia View Post
    Hi
    Can I say:

    Besides, I always felt I would succeed = in addition, I always felt...

    instead of

    Besides this, I always felt I would succeed= in addition to this (that I mentioned one sentence earlier), I alwyas felt....

    Is there any difference between the two sentences? You tell me.
    d

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    #6

    Re: beside/besides

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    d
    Besides means 'in addition to this/that .Why besides this?

  2. banderas's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: beside/besides

    Quote Originally Posted by rj1948 View Post
    Besides means 'in addition to this/that .Why besides this?
    It depends if it is used as an adverb or a preposition.

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    #8

    Re: beside/besides

    beside
    prep.

    1. At the side of; next to.

      1. In comparison with: a proposal that seems quite reasonable beside the others.
      2. On an equal footing with: has earned a place beside the best performers in the business.
    2. In addition to: “Many creatures beside man live in communities”
    3. Except for.
    4. Not relevant to: a remark that was beside the point.

    adv. Archaic.

    1. In addition.
    2. Nearby.

    idiom:
    beside (oneself)

    1. In a state of extreme excitement or agitation: They were beside themselves with glee.

    beside adj.- next to.

    Dear common flower, that grow'st beside the way, Fringing the dusty road with harmless gold.
    "Besides" (in addition to) putting the glass in the sink, she placed the book "beside" (at the side of) the bed.


    besides
    adv.

    1. In addition; also.
    2. Moreover; furthermore.
    3. Otherwise; else: has been to Mexico but nowhere besides.

    prep.

    1. In addition to.
    2. Except for; other than: No one besides the owner could control the dog.

    Some critics argue that beside and besides should be kept distinct when they are used as prepositions. According to that argument, beside is used only to mean “at the side of,” as in There was no one in the seat beside me. For the meanings “in addition to” and “except for” besides should be used: Besides replacing the back stairs, she fixed the broken banister. No one besides Smitty would say a thing like that. But this distinction is often ignored, even by widely respected writers. While it is true that besides can never mean “at the side of,” beside regularly appears in print in place of besides. Using beside in this way can be ambiguous, however; the sentence There was no one beside him at the table could mean that he had the table to himself or that the seats next to him were not occupied

    Regards.

    V.

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