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    #1

    sinister

    Will it be OK to use 'sinister' in 'The sun rose bright and sinister'?

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: sinister

    You realize that "sinister" means "evil"? Few things feel evil about a bright sun -- unless perhaps you are lost in the desert without water.

    The sun rose, bright and sinister.

    Because sinister is an adjective, is must modify a noun, the sun. Make sure your sentence doesn't ready as though sinister described the rising of the run -- the comma takes care of that.

    The adverb form is "sinisterly." (And you'd need "brightly" as well)


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    #3

    Re: sinister

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    You realize that "sinister" means "evil"? Few things feel evil about a bright sun -- unless perhaps you are lost in the desert without water.

    The sun rose, bright and sinister.

    Because sinister is an adjective, is must modify a noun, the sun. Make sure your sentence doesn't ready as though sinister described the rising of the run -- the comma takes care of that.

    The adverb form is "sinisterly." (And you'd need "brightly" as well)
    Thanks, Barb_D. Yes, I realize the meaning of sinister. I wasn't just sure the adjective could be applied to the sun, that's why I asked.

    It's interesting that you think a comma is a must here. I thought of this structure as a double predicate (the sun rose, the sun was bright and sinister). What if I remove one of the adjectives: The sun rose bright. Then there wouldn't be a need for a comma, would it?

  2. beascarpetta's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: sinister

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    T What if I remove one of the adjectives: The sun rose bright. Then there wouldn't be a need for a comma, would it?
    forgive me for barging in , but I still think you'd need an adverb as in

    the sun rose brightly (unless you are another Robert Burns or Charles Dickens, of course )
    no offence meant


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    #5

    Re: sinister

    Quote Originally Posted by beascarpetta View Post
    forgive me for barging in , but I still think you'd need an adverb as in

    the sun rose brightly (unless you are another Robert Burns or Charles Dickens, of course )
    no offence meant
    No, I'm just a humble teacher of English.

    I wonder if you would consider the following sentences as incorrect:

    The river had frozen solid during the night.
    He was frozen stiff.
    She toweled herself dry.
    Don't get me wrong.
    The new broom sweeps clean.
    Go slow, go easy, look before you leap.
    You'll have to judge it cold.

    etc., etc.


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    #6

    Re: sinister

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    No, I'm just a humble teacher of English.

    I wonder if you would consider the following sentences as incorrect:

    The river had frozen solid during the night.
    He was frozen stiff.
    She toweled herself dry.
    Don't get me wrong.
    The new broom sweeps clean.
    Go slow, go easy, look before you leap.
    You'll have to judge it cold.

    etc., etc.
    Apart from the last one, which is new to me, they are all fine. But I agree with the view that "sinister" is not a word I would regard as normally attached to "the sun" [unless you were being very pedantic about whether you saw on the right or left side].

    Is it a stand-alone sentence to demonstrate some grammatical point or part of a narrative?


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    #7

    Re: sinister

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    Apart from the last one, which is new to me, they are all fine. But I agree with the view that "sinister" is not a word I would regard as normally attached to "the sun" [unless you were being very pedantic about whether you saw on the right or left side].

    Is it a stand-alone sentence to demonstrate some grammatical point or part of a narrative?
    But Anglika, don't you think they have the same predicate structure?
    Look, 'the river froze solid' and 'the sun rose bright'.

    'Sinister'. It was a separate sentence to be translated into English. No context.

  3. Kraken's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #8

    Re: sinister

    But I agree with the view that "sinister" is not a word I would regard as normally attached to "the sun" [unless you were being very pedantic about whether you saw on the right or left side].
    Or unless you are a vampire...


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