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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 92
    #1

    Cool Tidbit=Rumour?

    Hello amigos!

    Ive got a juicy tidbit for you.

    Do tidbit equivalent to rumour?

    Thanks,

    Sam

  1. Snowcake's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 624
    #2

    Re: Tidbit=Rumour?

    Yes and no.

    If one says: 'I have an interesting titbit of news for you' this news can be a rumour. But if this sentence is followed by : 'John and Marry are getting married in June. Mary has just phoned me.' then it is clear that this 'titbit' isn't a rumour.

  2. banderas's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 1,512
    #3

    Re: Tidbit=Rumour?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    Yes and no.

    Sorry to change the subject, Snowcake but do you have any idea if there is an English word (one word) for Yes and No, like In German "Jaein"? How would you translate "Jaein" into English?

  3. Snowcake's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 624
    #4

    Re: Tidbit=Rumour?

    By the way:

    titbit = BrE
    tidbit = AE

    Just to avoid confusion ...


  4. Snowcake's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • German
      • Home Country:
      • Germany
      • Current Location:
      • Germany

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 624
    #5

    Re: Tidbit=Rumour?

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Sorry to change the subject, Snowcake but do you have any idea if there is an English word (one word) for Yes and No, like In German "Jaein"? How would you translate "Jaein" into English?
    That's a good question. I even thought about Jain/Jein when I was writing my post. Great minds think alike.

    I've just looked it up in my dic. It seems that there is no equivalent to Jain/Jein.
    However, I found this (written by an English native speaker)

    "Have you ever been to Munich?

    nyeeeer, I went once, but we just drove through it, I didn't get to see anything.
    There is no word as such, but there is a sound people make when they mean yes or no. Not very easy to explain here in words, but will happily record a demo!"


    To the other users: Jain/Jein is the German contraction of 'Yes and no' to say 'Yes, but ... - No, but ...'


    Oh banderas, your new avatar!! Great! But who is that?
    A. Banderas??


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