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    #1

    Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    Dear native speakers of English!
    i)Could you explain what multi-part verbs are and supply your explanation with good examples?
    ii) Is there any difference between base and basic salary?

    Thanking you in advance.

    All the best,
    Mariya

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    #2

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    1) THere are two categories of multi-part verbs:
    #1 Synthetic verb form
    A multi-part verb form expressing one of a variety of possible degrees of pastness, futurity, completeness, habitualness, determination, uncertainty or the like.

    Ex: I should have been trying to please them, but I forgot.

    #2 Phrasal verbs
    Click here Multi-Part Verbs -- TURN
    2) To my knowledge, both base salary and basic salary refer to the salary you start at when you join a company. The two, however, can differ. Some employers might use the term base salary to mean that your salary will increase over the term of your employment. For example, "The base salary is ___, and in 6 months it will increase to___". As for basic salary, "The basic salary is ___. There is no increase. Ever." But that is just an example. Some employers might use basic to mean base.



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    #3

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    [quote=Soup;300619]1) THere are two categories of multi-part verbs:
    #1 Synthetic verb form
    A multi-part verb form expressing one of a variety of possible degrees of pastness, futurity, completeness, habitualness, determination, uncertainty or the like.

    Ex: I should have been trying to please them, but I forgot.

    Thank you for your valuable explanation but i got a question concerning synthetic verb form. Is "should have been trying" really a synthetic verb form? I thought it was an analytical one, as synthetical forms take changes only inside themselves, not adding any other forms like auxiliary or modal verbs. Am i completely wrong about this?
    Could you please distinguish synthetical and analytical verb forms here?

    Thanking you in advance.

    All the best,
    Mariya

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    #4

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    Quote Originally Posted by MashUK View Post
    Is "should have been trying" really a synthetic verb form?
    Yes. But not in the expected sense. It means put together, not housed as a whole; e.g., phrasal verbs are housed in the lexical as a whole, whereas verbs/verb phrases like the one above are synthetic (i.e., constructed/manufactured), and not housed as a whole.

    Does that help?


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    #5

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Yes. But not in the expected sense. It means put together, not housed as a whole; e.g., phrasal verbs are housed in the lexical as a whole, whereas verbs/verb phrases like the one above are synthetic (i.e., constructed/manufactured), and not housed as a whole.

    Does that help?

    I understand the poster's resistance to accept the form 'should have been doing' as a synthetic one. I would also call it 'analytical'. There are a lot of differences between the Russian and the English school of language as far as terms are concerned. I believe here a lexical unit is opposed to a grammatical unit. But to me both are analytical of course.

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    #6

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    I understand the poster's resistance to accept the form 'should have been doing' as a synthetic one. I would also call it 'analytical'. There are a lot of differences between the Russian and the English school of language as far as terms are concerned. I believe here a lexical unit is opposed to a grammatical unit. But to me both are analytical of course.
    Your arguing semantics. The author of the term "syntheic verb form" (Sorry, I thought I had posted the link--I had not; see below) is not comparing mophology or language types, but rather using the word to mean, not a real or genuine multi-part verb; those, the real mcCoy, being phrasal verbs.

    The UVic Writer's Guide: Grammar


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    #7

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Your arguing semantics. The author of the term "syntheic verb form" (Sorry, I thought I had posted the link--I had not; see below) is not comparing mophology or language types, but rather using the word to mean, not a real or genuine multi-part verb; those, the real mcCoy, being phrasal verbs.

    The UVic Writer's Guide: Grammar
    Your are right. To me synthetic vs. analytical is a typological division.
    What confusion we have with all those terms! Amazing.


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    #8

    Re: Multi-part verbs, base/basic salary

    [quote=Soup;301156]Yes. But not in the expected sense. It means put together, not housed as a whole; e.g., phrasal verbs are housed in the lexical as a whole, whereas verbs/verb phrases like the one above are synthetic (i.e., constructed/manufactured), and not housed as a whole.

    Does that help?

    Er...Not sure if it does
    Can you advise something for further reading on synthetical/analytical forms please?

    Thanks for your help

    All the best,
    Mariya

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