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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    don the garb of ?

    Welcome to the 21st Century. Where practicing law requires us to don the garb of computers and the Internet. And where litigation is as costly as ever. Lawyer bills running $10,000 a month are not unusual in a hotly contested breach of contract lawsuit. With every word, phrase and sentence carrying the potential for winning or losing, the stakes are high. Simple logic, therefore, directs us to cautious and thoughtful drafting.
    Hi!
    Q1: " don the garb of " = make use of?

    Q2: Is " don the garb of " a metaphor or an idiom?

    Q3: Could you please make another sentence with " don the garb of" for me?

    Thanks in advance!


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    #2

    Re: don the garb of ?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi!
    Q1: " don the garb of " = make use of?

    Q2: Is " don the garb of " a metaphor or an idiom?

    Q3: Could you please make another sentence with " don the garb of" for me?

    Thanks in advance!
    Welcome to the 21st Century. Where practicing law requires us to don the garb of computers and the Internet.

    I don't get the connection here, TD. 'don' the garb of' means 'put on the clothes of'.

    We had to don the garb of medieval knights.

    Granted there can be metaphorical meanings but this one still is a bit puzzling to me. Perhaps someone else can point up something I'm missing.

  2. banderas's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: don the garb of ?

    Quote Originally Posted by thedaffodils View Post
    Hi!

    Q3: Could you please make another sentence with " don the garb of" for me?
    "Stubbornly embracing the American dream, desperate to be a hero, George dons the garb and performs good deeds."
    Don the garb=put on some cloths. Try to figure out the rest with computers and internet.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: don the garb of ?

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Welcome to the 21st Century. Where practicing law requires us to don the garb of computers and the Internet.

    I don't get the connection here, TD...
    I agree that this is a rather strained metaphor, but it makes more sense in terms of British legal practice. American lawyers look like any other business man or woman - though maybe there are some subtle tell-tale signs that I'm missing

    But British barristers ("advocates" in Scotland, I think) wear not just a uniform but a historical-looking garb - a wig and gown - in some courts. So the user of this metaphor was saying 'In the 21st century, barristers - as well as donning the traditional garb - have to use ICT''. I don't much like the metaphor, but I think this is the point.

    b

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: don the garb of ?

    riverkid, banderas & bobk, thank you very much for your help.

    bobk, your interpretation is well grounded. I think you are right on the mark.

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I agree that this is a rather strained metaphor, but it makes more sense in terms of British legal practice. American lawyers look like any other business man or woman - though maybe there are some subtle tell-tale signs that I'm missing

    But British barristers ("advocates" in Scotland, I think) wear not just a uniform but a historical-looking garb - a wig and gown - in some courts. So the user of this metaphor was saying 'In the 21st century, barristers - as well as donning the traditional garb - have to use ICT''. I don't much like the metaphor, but I think this is the point.

    b
    It is a little strange that the author is an American lawyer and obviously he refers to the practice in the States. He used $ rather than in his article.



    Lawyer bills running $10,000 a month are not unusual in a hotly contested breach of contract lawsuit.

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