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    #1

    flora and fauna

    Hi, there!

    I'd like to ask about the word order of "flora" and "fauna".
    I understand "flora and fauna" looks normal, but is "fauna and flora" wrong? My dictionary says ony the former is okay, but I vaguely remember seeing "fauna and flora" in a news paper or magazine.
    I'd appreciate your advice.

    OP

  1. Kraken's Avatar

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    #2

    Re: flora and fauna

    I have always heard flora and fauna, I think it wouldn't be wrong the other way round, but its kind of a collocation, most people say it that way.

    On a side note, it is the same in Spanish (flora y fauna).

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: flora and fauna

    Don't let it drive you crazy. Both are used.

  3. banderas's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: flora and fauna

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Don't let it drive you crazy. Both are used.
    Cambridge Dictionary says:
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Not the other way around. Do not get me wrong. I do not mind using it the other way around but the collocation is flora and fauna.
    Another example is "practice makes perfect" which is a collocation and people use many different versions of it. It is not about right or wrong but about what the collocation is.

  4. Soup's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: flora and fauna

    Quote Originally Posted by banderas View Post
    Cambridge Dictionary says:
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

    Not the other way around. Do not get me wrong. I do not mind using it the other way around but the collocation is flora and fauna.
    Another example is "practice makes perfect" which is a collocation and people use many different versions of it. It is not about right or wrong but about what the collocation is.
    The collocation goes either way. Learned bodies use both, as research will show, if you choose to look into the matter.

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    #6

    Re: flora and fauna

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    The collocation goes either way. Learned bodies use both, as research will show, if you choose to look into the matter.
    Hi, Soup, friendly discussion time!
    I agree but still ,more "flora and fauna" than "fauna and flora".
    Google:
    Results 1 - 10 of about 4,390,000 for flora and fauna
    Results 1 - 10 of about 1,520,000 for fauna and flora



    BNC:
    Your query was flora and fauna:
    Here is a random selection of 50 solutions from the 132 found.


    Your query was fauna and flora:
    Only 38 solutions found for this query

  6. Soup's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: flora and fauna

    Google is a great resource, I'll admit to that; however, be careful about assuming that each count is individual; it is not. Most are embedded.

    Google this line "fauna and flora" and "flora and fauna" and take a look at the enteries. You'll find that even within the same article, writers use both.

    I checked out Tufts University Library site on Bio-diversity. The library "stacks" heading is Flora and Fauna, yet the books listed are entitled "Fanua and Flora", one 1903, the other 1973. Check it out. That's just one of a dozen sites I visited.

    Another site was Wikipedia. They list the organization "Fauna and Flora International", but when talking about it, they call it "Flora and Fauna". Again, that is just one of many I came across this evening.

    All the best

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