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    #1

    gerund

    1. The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to obtain an amicable settement.

    2. The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to obtaining an amicable settement.

    Which of the above sentences is correct or are both the sentences correct?

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    #2

    Re: gerund

    In the phrase with a view to, to is a preposition, short for toward, and requires a noun. In this case, a gerund, the -ing:
    The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to(ward) obtaining an amicable settement.
    Consider,

    The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to(ward) improvement. [noun]

  3. #3

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    In the phrase with a view to, to is a preposition, short for toward, and requires a noun. In this case, a gerund, the -ing:
    The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to(ward) obtaining an amicable settement.
    Consider,

    The Committe have been bringing up the matter with the various authorities with a view to(ward) improvement. [noun]
    /to/ is not an abbreviation of /towards/ in my dialect, making its ininfinitive marker status more natural. Hence #1 is more appropriate. However, both of these sentences are incorrect in spelling and agreement. They are also ambiguous because we don't know who has a view to obtain(ing) an amicable settlement: the authorities or the Committee?

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: gerund

    I agree with soup. In the phrase 'with a view to' to has to function as a preposition and can not take a verb.

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    #5

    Re: gerund


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    #6

    Re: gerund

    I'm not a teacher

    Hi Manas Ranian Mallick,

    with a view to: Information and Much More from Answers.com
    in view of: Information and Much More from Answers.com

    with a view to = for the purpose of, aiming toward, as in

    A-frame houses were designed with a view to shedding heavy snow.

    with a view to = considering, in prospect or anticipation of, as in

    Dan started saving money with a view to going to law school.
    (I think the second “to” is the mentioned of you “preposition”.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #7

    Re: gerund

    Other sources:

    view - Definition from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary
    — with a view to : with the object of <studied hard with a view to getting an A>

    view - definition from dictionary.die.net
    the phrase "with a view to" means "with the intention of"; "he took the computer with a view to pawning it"


    view. The American Heritage&#174; Dictionary of the English Language: Fourth Edition. 2000.
    Something kept in sight as an aim or intention: “The pitch of the roof had been calculated with a view to the heavy seasonal rains” (Caroline Alexander). 9. Expectation; chance: The measure has no view of success.

    with a view to + NOUN

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    #8

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by bickle View Post
    /to/ is not an abbreviation of /towards/ in my dialect, making its ininfinitive marker status more natural.
    Dialect, even idiolect, and this development is recent, of course. Modern English speakers switch between the two elsewhere in the grammar; e.g., I like to swim; I like swimming, and are now applying this to other structures. The "new" rule, albeit yet to be accepted formally, is as follows. Because the function of the word to in the phrase with a view to is ambiguous (it could be an infinitive marker or a preposition), speakers in turn provide a ambiguous form, the absolute noun to obtain, instead of the more traditional preposition + gerund form to obtaining.

    As for which one is "right"? It depends on how we define 'right' and who is defining it. Our present day sources tell us the phrase with a view to takes a noun. In a couple of years, though, you'll find them saying otherwise; that it can take either a gerund or an absolute noun phrase. Wait for it.

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    #9

    Exclamation Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    I'm not a teacher

    Hi Manas Ranian Mallick,

    with a view to: Information and Much More from Answers.com
    in view of: Information and Much More from Answers.com

    with a view to = for the purpose of, aiming toward, as in

    A-frame houses were designed with a view to shedding heavy snow.

    with a view to = considering, in prospect or anticipation of, as in

    Dan started saving money with a view to going to law school.
    (I think the second “to” is the mentioned of you “preposition”.

    Regards.

    V.
    Hi Vil! Thank you for the fitting examples which only justify soup's contention. The 'to' mentioned by me refered to 'with a view to'

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    #10

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    Hi Vil! Thank you for the fitting examples which only justify soup's contention. The 'to' mentioned by me refered to 'with a view to'
    With a view to-With the intention of.
    REF :Online dictionary .com.
    ... with a view to obtaining.....is OK.
    Regards,
    rj1948.

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