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    #1

    Plurals of nationalities

    The plural of a Czech is the Czechs.
    The plural of a Swede is the Swedes.
    What is the plural of a French person/man/woman? Is it the French?

    And how about the plural of a Scot? Is it the Scottish or the Scots?

    Thanks for assistance.

    Waawe
    Last edited by Waawe; 28-May-2008 at 22:11.


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    #2

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    A scot, some scots.

    A Frenchman, some Frenchmen.

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    #3

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    A scot, some scots.

    A Frenchman, some Frenchmen.
    Thanks for a prompt answer,Anglika.

    I see. So if I write "The French are famous for their fine wines.", the sentence is wrong, I have to change it into "The Frenchmen are famous for their fine wines?"

    Does the subject Frenchmen, then, involve Frenchwomen, too?

    So is the following table of mine correct?

    Country Adjective Singular Plural

    USA American an American the Americans
    Czech Republic Czech a Czech the Czechs
    Sweden Swedish a Swedish or a Swede the Swedes (or can I use the Swedish here?)
    France French a Frenchman the Frenchmen(not the French)

    Thanks for your extensive amount of patience...


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    #4

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    No. A Frenchman. The French
    An Englishman. The English.
    A Scotsman is shortened to 'a Scot'

    USA American an American the Americans or Americans
    The Americans I know aren't loud-mouthed rednecks. (because I am referring to a group of particular Americans, the ones I know personally.)
    Americans love their expensive cars. (Americans in general)
    This will be similar for those below.

    Czech Republic Czech a Czech the Czechs

    Sweden Swedish a Swede the Swedes (or can I use the Swedish here?)
    I don't think many people would say, 'the Swedes' - I for one would say, the Swedish. But get more opinions on that one. It's just that we seem to refer so little to Norway,Sweden and Finland for some reason, in the UK!

    France French a Frenchman Frenchmen the French)
    Last edited by David L.; 30-May-2008 at 07:29.

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    #5

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    No. A Frenchman. The French
    An Englishman. The English.
    A Scotsman is shortened to 'a Scot'

    USA American an American the Americans or Americans
    The Americans I know aren't loud-mouthed rednecks. (because I am referring to a group of particular Americans, the ones I know personally.)
    Americans love their expensive cars. (Americans in general)
    This will be similar for those below.

    Czech Republic Czech a Czech the Czechs

    Sweden Swedish a Swede the Swedes (or can I use the Swedish here?)
    I don't think many people would say, 'the Swedes' - I for one would say, the Swedish. But get more opinions on that one. It's just that we seem to refer so little to Norway,Sweden and Finland for some reason, in the UK!

    France French a Frenchman Frenchmen the French)
    Thanks a lot for your help.

    #1
    You say:
    Americans = generic use but the Americans = specific use

    but

    the French = both generic and specific

    Is it correct? Is there a rule that for nationalities in plural, when we dont add the ending -s, we always use the definite article?

    #2
    A Scotsman - Scots. How about the Scottish? Is that acceptable?

    Thanks.


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    #6

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    The plural of a Czech is the Czechs.
    The plural of a Swede is the Swedes.
    What is the plural of a French person/man/woman? Is it the French?

    And how about the plural of a Scot? Is it the Scottish or the Scots?

    Thanks for assistance.

    Waawe
    One Czech - three Czechs - the Czechs (as a nation)
    One Swede - three Swedes - the Swedes (as a nation)
    One Frenchman - three Frenchmen - the French (as a nation)
    One Scot - three Scots - the Scots (as a nation)

    Scottish is an adjective. As a noun it means the language spoken in Scotland.


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    #7

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Scottish, as a noun for Scots, is only uttered by brave souls within earshot of a Scot. There may be the Scottish Highlands and Scottish shortbread; and so what is the speaker implying, the Scottish what?
    Their own language is not Scottish, but Gaelic.

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    #8

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    No. A Frenchman. The French
    An Englishman. The English.
    A Scotsman is shortened to 'a Scot'

    USA American an American the Americans or Americans
    The Americans I know aren't loud-mouthed rednecks. (because I am referring to a group of particular Americans, the ones I know personally.)
    Americans love their expensive cars. (Americans in general)
    This will be similar for those below.

    Czech Republic Czech a Czech the Czechs

    Sweden Swedish a Swede the Swedes (or can I use the Swedish here?)
    I don't think many people would say, 'the Swedes' - I for one would say, the Swedish. But get more opinions on that one. It's just that we seem to refer so little to Norway,Sweden and Finland for some reason, in the UK!

    France French a Frenchman Frenchmen the French)

    You say:
    Americans = generic use but the Americans = specific use

    but

    the French = both generic and specific

    Is it correct? Is there a rule that for nationalities in plural, when we dont add the ending -s, we always use the definite article?


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    #9

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Scottish, as a noun for Scots, is only uttered by brave souls within earshot of a Scot. There may be the Scottish Highlands and Scottish shortbread; and so what is the speaker implying, the Scottish what?
    Their own language is not Scottish, but Gaelic.

    Scots [Lallan] is a language, that is still spoken in the Lowlands and Borders; the Doric was spoken in the northeast; Gaelic is the language of the Highlands and Islands.

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    #10

    Re: Plurals of nationalities

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    No. A Frenchman. The French
    An Englishman. The English.
    A Scotsman is shortened to 'a Scot'

    USA American an American the Americans or Americans


    The Americans I know aren't loud-mouthed rednecks. (because I am referring to a group of particular Americans, the ones I know personally.)


    Americans love their expensive cars. (Americans in general)

    This will be similar for those below.

    Thus: The French I know don't scorn speaking English and French love their expensive wines?


    Czech Republic Czech a Czech the Czechs

    Sweden Swedish a Swede the Swedes (or can I use the Swedish here?)
    I don't think many people would say, 'the Swedes' - I for one would say, the Swedish. But get more opinions on that one. It's just that we seem to refer so little to Norway,Sweden and Finland for some reason, in the UK!

    France French a Frenchman Frenchmen the French)
    Is that right?

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