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    #1

    shabby

    Dear teachers,

    If a car looks old or in poor condition can I say "It looks shabby"?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you in advance.

    Jiang

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: shabby

      • A familiar morning sight, and a thoroughly characteristic one, is that of a fine car driving up to a good-class house, followed by a shabby car, which takes
      • The car has only one wiper, one door mirror and other things that make it look like a shabby car.
      • I once walked through a town with fifteen minutes in hand before my meeting, I noticed the rather shabby car park opposite that is attached to a Fitness ...
      • You may drive a shabby car, but you might be a great dancer and a loyal friend.

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    #3

    Re: shabby

    Hi,
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see. Could you please tell me in which dictionary you found the examples?

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post

      • A familiar morning sight, and a thoroughly characteristic one, is that of a fine car driving up to a good-class house, followed by a shabby car, which takes
      • The car has only one wiper, one door mirror and other things that make it look like a shabby car.
      • I once walked through a town with fifteen minutes in hand before my meeting, I noticed the rather shabby car park opposite that is attached to a Fitness ...
      • You may drive a shabby car, but you might be a great dancer and a loyal friend.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: shabby

    The human dictionary, of course. Google.

    ________________
    Jiang, by the way, you could save yourself some time and effort by clicking on the "Thanks" key located at the bottom corner of each post. This way you needn't type in the long & formal "thanks" every time you post.

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    #5

    Re: shabby

    Hi,

    I do click on the "Thanks" key the first time I receive a reply. I am just worried that if I don't type in a sence it would be impolite. Now since you suggest I don't need to type in the long and & formal "thanks" I will follow your advice. I hope nobody will feel I am impolite.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    The human dictionary, of course. Google.

    ________________
    Jiang, by the way, you could save yourself some time and effort by clicking on the "Thanks" key located at the bottom corner of each post. This way you needn't type in the long & formal "thanks" every time you post.

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    #6

    Re: shabby

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post

    by the way, you could save yourself some time and effort by clicking on the "Thanks" key located at the bottom corner of each post. This way you needn't type in the long & formal "thanks" every time you post.
    I agree! I personally click on the offcial-forum thank you button even if a post is not useful for me. If I find it useful and interesting in a general sense or useful for the asking person, I go ahead and give the official thank you. It is a good practice, I believe.


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    #7

    Re: shabby

    If I were using 'shabby' to describe a car, I would be referring to the interior only, in particular the upholstery, which would be torn, dirty, faded. The dashboard maybe faded by the sun. I wouldn't refer to the outer bodywork of a car that is dented, with poor paint work, as 'shabby'. 'shabby' has the sense of threadbare and faded from wear.
    So, we use 'shabby' to describe clothes, and again, furniture such as couches and settees and other upholstery items which would be out-of-date, very worn to the extent of having holes, and maybe lost it 'springiness' so it looks like the cushions sag.
    Of a car, I'd be saying "it's a bomb' 'it's a wreck', 'it looks a wreck', 'it's ready for the scrapyard'.

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    #8

    Re: shabby

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    So, we use 'shabby' to describe clothes, and again, furniture such as couches and settees and other upholstery items
    I agree. I would add buildings to this description yet.

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