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    #1

    Cool Get through Vs Go through?

    Hello amigos!

    Could anyone give me examples where these verbs are used in different ways, I havenīt fixed it on my mind and most probably with a few examples I can understand it better:)

    Thanks,

    Sam

  1. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Get through Vs Go through?

    Quote Originally Posted by sambistapt View Post
    Hello amigos!

    Could anyone give me examples where these verbs are used in different ways, I havenīt fixed it on my mind and most probably with a few examples I can understand it better:)

    Thanks,

    Sam

    We have to start now - there's a lot to get through. ( a lot to do / complete)

    All students in our class got through the exam (passed it).

    I got all my students through the exam (helped them to pass it)

    The alliance of the two parties got the bill trough most of the state congresses. (they made it to be officially accepted)

    Yesterday I tried phoning you several times but I couldn't get through.

    Lack of consesus has made the deal impossible to go through (to be officially accepted)

    Could you go through the last five pages again so that we can start discussing the main ideas?

    They have been going through bad times for the last 2 months.

    Jacob and Emma went through the whole loave of bread this morning. Could you go to the baker's and get two loaves of wholemeal bread?

    Last edited by Snowcake; 29-May-2008 at 22:51.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Get through Vs Go through?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post
    ...
    Jacob and Emma went through t[wo] whole loave[s] of bread this morning. Could you go to the baker's and get two loaves [of] wholemeal bread?
    ...
    This example reminded me another possible meaning for 'go through':

    Ronaldo went through the Arsenal defence like a knife through butter.

    There! Another meaning of 'go through' and a metaphor into the bargain.

    b
    Last edited by BobK; 29-May-2008 at 23:13. Reason: Added correction: 'loaves OF bread'

  3. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Get through Vs Go through?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    This example reminded me another possible meaning for 'go through':

    Ronaldo went through the Arsenal defence like a knife through butter.

    There! Another meaning of 'go through' and a metaphor into the bargain.

    b



    Great example!

    p.s.: so there is no singular of 'loaves'?

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Get through Vs Go through?

    Quote Originally Posted by Snowcake View Post


    Great example!

    p.s.: so there is no singular of 'loaves'?
    Yes there is: 'loaf'. I saw the v and assumed an s was missing.

    G'night.

    b

  5. Snowcake's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Get through Vs Go through?

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Yes there is: 'loaf'. I saw the v and assumed an s was missing.

    Oh, yes. The penny has dropped. I should have known better. One of the first English lessons ...

    G'night.

    Thank you. Good night.

    b

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