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    #1

    I don't want/please don't do

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough help me to make the better choice?

    1.1. Please don’t buy this camera.
    1.2. I don’t want you to buy this camera.

    2.1. Do you want me to draw the curtains?
    2.2. Would you like me to draw the curtains?

    Which of them sounds better in English?

    Thank you in advance for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    All are OK, vil. What context would you be using them in?


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    #3

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    1.1 = is a more polite form of saying 1.2 and realy is a request
    1.2 = is a firm way of saying the same thing. It is more an order than a request

    2.1 = is the normal question you would ask.
    2.2 = is just a slightly more polite form of saying 2.1

    Regards
    Sinatra

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    #4

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you for your affirmative reply.

    My intention in the first case was to show than I am a man of experience concerning the cameras but at the same time I don’t want to be overconfident and self-assertive by dealing (conversation) with my son. In the second case I want to inform myself if my son prefers to keep in secret our new commercial policy.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #5

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    Hi Sinatra,

    Thank you for your promt reply as well as for your clear and edifying explanation.

    Thank you for backing.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #6

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    1. Father to son: This is experience talking, you shouldn't buy this camera.

    2. Farther to son: Should I draw the curtains?

    Vil, you mentioned the second one is about a company policy? The phrase 'draw the curtains' is not an idiom. It's literal.

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    #7

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    Hi Soup,

    Thank you again for your kindness.

    Nevertheless I would put a few debatable questions concerning my unsuccessful effort to start using a new idiom in English language namely “draw the curtains”. Do you know the meaning of the expression “lift the curtain”? I will help you: “to reveal a secret”. Do you know also something about “the iron curtain”? Would you be kind tell me why sometimes there is an idiomatic meaning in some expression and another time the meaning of the same expression is literal?

    I apologize to you for my intrusive curiosity.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #8

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Nevertheless I would put a few debatable questions concerning my unsuccessful effort to start using a new idiom in English language namely “draw the curtains”. Do you know the meaning of the expression “lift the curtain”? I will help you: “to reveal a secret”. Do you know also something about “the iron curtain”? Would you be kind tell me why sometimes there is an idiomatic meaning in some expression and another time the meaning of the same expression is literal?

    I apologize to you for my intrusive curiosity.

    Regards.

    V.
    I'm still a wee bit in the dark here. Do you want to reveal a secret to your son or have your son keep a secret?

    Reveal a secret: let you in on ...
    Keep a secret: Keep this on the hush-hush.

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    #9

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    There's also, to keep something on the q.t. (q.t. means quiet).

    The phrase dates to at least 1884 when it appears in George Moore’s A Mummer’s Wife: "
    (Source: Oxford English Dictionary, 2nd Edition)
    Wordorigins.org

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    #10

    Re: I don't want/please don't do

    Hi Soup,

    This is how matters stand: If the meaning of the expression “lift the curtain” is “reveal the secret” so the meaning of the expression “draw the curtains” in my humble opinion should be “keep a secret”= “don’t spill the beans” = “don’t let the cat out of the bag”.

    Thank you for your original expressions “keep this on the hush-hush”, “on the quiet”, “undercover “. The latter is very close to my “behind the curtains”, or “under the veil”. For example “to draw a veil over smth.” = “to draw the curtains”.


    Something that conceals, separates, or screens like a curtain: a veil of secrecy. To prevent (something) from being known: conceal, cover (up), enshroud, hide, hush (up), mask, shroud, veil. Idioms: keep under cover, keep under wraps(my keep behind the curtains).


    Thank you for your impressive perseverance.

    Regards.

    V.

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