Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 468
    #1

    Meaning and usage of Language Terms

    I would be grateful if you could enlighten me on the following terms (much appreciated it if examples could be given as well):

    "causative verb 、 factitive verb 、 ergative verb 、 delexical verb"

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 40
    #2

    Re: Meaning and usage of Language Terms

    Hi,

    1. Causative verbs are used when we do not carry out an action but are responsible for the action being performed:

    She had her watch repaired yesterday. (she caused this action by giving her watch to the person who eventually repaired it)

    2. Transitive verbs that can take two objects are called factitive verbs (make, choose, judge, elect, select, name):

    The Faculty elected Preston the new Academic Dean. ("Preston" in this case is the direct object and "Academic Dean" is the second complement)

    3. Ergative verbs can be found in sentences where the verb affects the subject:

    The butter melted. (The butter didn't melt itself - it required the heat of the sun)

    4. Delexical verbs are the ones used in contexts where they have very little meaning but occur with an object noun which describes an action. Verbs like make, take, have are often delexical:

    Make a guess (just "guess" would be sufficient, "make" is delexical)

    Do you really need to learn all those details?



    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • Hong Kong
      • Current Location:
      • Hong Kong

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 468
    #3

    Re: Meaning and usage of Language Terms

    Quote Originally Posted by Aligor View Post
    Hi,

    1. Causative verbs are used when we do not carry out an action but are responsible for the action being performed:

    She had her watch repaired yesterday. (she caused this action by giving her watch to the person who eventually repaired it)

    2. Transitive verbs that can take two objects are called factitive verbs (make, choose, judge, elect, select, name):

    The Faculty elected Preston the new Academic Dean. ("Preston" in this case is the direct object and "Academic Dean" is the second complement)

    3. Ergative verbs can be found in sentences where the verb affects the subject:

    The butter melted. (The butter didn't melt itself - it required the heat of the sun)

    4. Delexical verbs are the ones used in contexts where they have very little meaning but occur with an object noun which describes an action. Verbs like make, take, have are often delexical:

    Make a guess (just "guess" would be sufficient, "make" is delexical)

    Do you really need to learn all those details?

    Just for learning.

Similar Threads

  1. Meaning Of A Usage
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 07-Dec-2007, 02:46
  2. linguistic theories (grammar, language)
    By bianca in forum Linguistics
    Replies: 57
    Last Post: 24-Aug-2007, 08:09
  3. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 18-Dec-2006, 06:27
  4. meaning and usage
    By negar_aghili in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Sep-2005, 11:58
  5. "No sooner..." - the exact meaning and usage
    By Tomasz Klimkiewicz in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Sep-2004, 19:31

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •