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    #1

    3 different inquiries

    Hello,
    #1 I have been taught that after the form been in the perfect tenses, we should always use the preposition to. Thus, eg, I have been to France twice.

    Is it a correct use? The same rule applied?

    How about the sentence "She hasn't been to/in her office since the morning."

    #2 Can we use yet in affirmative sentences, as in "I have spoken to him yet?"

    #3 Which reaction is the most likely?

    Don't drop by at me after 8.

    A/ I am watching the football match.
    B/ I will be watching the football match.
    C/ I will watch the football match.
    D/ I am going to watch the football match.


    Considering the options, Id go for A, B or D.

    How about you? Thanks.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Hello,
    #1 I have been taught that after the form been in the perfect tenses, we should always use the preposition to. Thus, eg, I have been to France twice.

    Is it a correct use? The same rule applied?

    How about the sentence "She hasn't been to/in her office since the morning."

    #2 Can we use yet in affirmative sentences, as in "I have spoken to him yet?"

    #3 Which reaction is the most likely?

    Don't drop by at me after 8.

    A/ I am watching the football match.
    B/ I will be watching the football match.
    C/ I will watch the football match.
    D/ I am going to watch the football match.


    Considering the options, Id go for A, B or D.

    How about you? Thanks.

    How about the sentence "She hasn't been to/in her office since the morning." Either is ok.

    #2 Can we use yet in affirmative sentences, as in "I have spoken to him yet?"

    No, you can't use it in that sentence, it would have to be "I havn't spoken to him yet."

    Don't drop by at my house after 8.

    A/ I am watching the football match.
    B/ I will be watching the football match.
    C/ I will watch the football match.
    D/ I am going to watch the football match.

    B/ and C/ are ok.

  2. Kraken's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #3

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    I am not a teacher, AND I don't want to step on anyone's toes, but I have seen "yet" in affirmative sentences. I am not saying that it is grammatically acceptable (I don't know for sure), but I have seen it before.
    #2. "I have spoken to him yet". "I have already spoken to him".

    #3. On the other hand, I have never heard "Don't drop by at my house..."

    I think it should be "Don't drop by (my house) after 8, because I will be watching the football match" (Only B for me).

    Again, just my two cents and I'm here to learn, too.


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    #4

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    I agree with Kraken on most points, but D is also possible:

    Don't drop by my house/place after 8p.m. I'm going to watch the football match (tonight) so I'll be glued to the set...and I know you hate football!


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    #5

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Hello,
    #1 I have been taught that after the form been in the perfect tenses, we should always use the preposition to. Thus, eg, I have been to France twice.

    Is it a correct use? The same rule applied?

    You can be 'to' someplace without having been 'in' someplace. Granted, it's pretty hard for a country, though I suppose you could walk up to the border and be driven back by a hail of bullets or even the threat of same.

    I've been to their office five times but I've never been in their office once. The door was always locked.


    How about the sentence "She hasn't been to/in her office since the morning."

    'the', with morning, sounds a bit odd, Waawe. Did you mean 'this morning'?

    #2 Can we use yet in affirmative sentences, as in "I have spoken to him yet?"

    I'm leaning to Bhaisabah's side on this but something twigged in my brain, so I'd be more than willing to look at some examples in context.

    Of course this isn't 'yet', with a use like,

    I have spoken to him, yet [the result is understood by the parties]


    #3 Which reaction is the most likely?

    Don't drop by after 8.

    [I]A/ I am watching the football match.

    Present continuous for the future can't be used here because it has intruded into the realm of the present continuous. Would it be alright with the inclusion of a time adverb?

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match later.

    It still sounds a bit odd to me.

    Certainly as a stand alone, it would be okay.

    A: Wacha doin' tonight?

    B: I am watching the football match.


    B/ I will be watching the football match.
    C/ I will watch the football match.
    D/ I am going to watch the football match.

    Of these three, C sounds the most unnatural because it seems to be something decided. The other two sound as natural as can be.

    Considering the options, I'd go for A, B or D.

    How about you? Thanks.
    !@#$%^

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    #6

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    I agree with Kraken on most points, but D is also possible:

    Don't drop by my house/place after 8p.m. I'm going to watch the football match (tonight) so I'll be glued to the set...and I know you hate football!
    Hey, thanks for help.

    What is the reason for not using the present progressive?

    We can also use it for planned, arranged near future activities, such as in "Im seeing the doctor tomorrow," cant we?

    Or do I miss a difference?

    Thanks.

    Waawe


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    #7

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Don't drop by after 8.

    [I]A/ I am watching the football match.

    Present continuous for the future can't be used here because it has intruded into the realm of the present continuous. Would it be alright with the inclusion of a time adverb?

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match later.

    [It still sounds a bit odd to me.]


    I retract that last statement, which I've put in brackets. After saying it a few times and sticking in some other time adverbs, I'm pretty sure that it's okay.

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match tonight.

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match (starting) at eight.
    Last edited by riverkid; 05-Jun-2008 at 21:55.


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    #8

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by Waawe View Post
    Hey, thanks for the help.

    What is the reason for not using the present progressive?

    We can also use it for planned, arranged near future activities, such as in "I'm seeing the doctor tomorrow," can't we?

    Or [do] have I missed a difference?

    Thanks.

    Waawe
    Waawe,

    'do' carries a meaning of regularly/habitually/routinely. You want 'have +PP', which notes greater importance or just past simple 'did'.

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    #9

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    Don't drop by after 8.

    A/ I am watching the football match.

    Present continuous for the future can't be used here because it has intruded into the realm of the present continuous. Would it be alright with the inclusion of a time adverb?

    What do you mean by Present continuous for the future can't be used here because it has intruded into the realm of the present continuous?

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match later.

    [It still sounds a bit odd to me.]

    I retract that last statement, which I've put in brackets. After saying it a few times and sticking in some other time adverbs, I'm pretty sure that it's okay.

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match tonight.

    Don't drop by after 8. I am watching the football match (starting) at eight

    Thus, do you suggest without the inclusion of an adverbial it sounds clumsy, but with including one, its OK?
    Waawe

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: 3 different inquiries

    Quote Originally Posted by Kraken View Post
    I am not a teacher, AND I don't want to step on anyone's toes, but I have seen "yet" in affirmative sentences. I am not saying that it is grammatically acceptable (I don't know for sure), but I have seen it before.
    #2. "I have spoken to him yet". "I have already spoken to him".

    #3. On the other hand, I have never heard "Don't drop by at my house..."

    I think it should be "Don't drop by (my house) after 8, because I will be watching the football match" (Only B for me).

    Again, just my two cents and I'm here to learn, too.
    "I have spoken to him yet." If this is English usage, then I must be from an alternative universe.

    Also if "Don't drop by at my house." is not normal English usage, then I am doubly sure.

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