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    #1

    grammar and at ease

    Dear teachers,

    I have two questions:

    No.1
    _______________ there, he found a great deal to interest him.
    a. This being his first visit b. This being his first time to visit

    The key is "a". Could you please explain why "b" isn't correct?

    No.2
    I know I can say "somebody feels at ease". But then I came across a phrase :

    a decision that something is not at ease

    Could you please kindly explain the meaning of it?

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Thank you inadvance.

    Jiang

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: grammar and at ease

    No.1
    _______________ there, he found a great deal to interest him.

    a. This being his first visit <nominal>
    b. This being his first time to visit <absolute, to-infinitive = unrealized>
    c. This being his first time visiting <gerund; -ing = realized>

    No.2
    What's the context?

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    #3

    Re: grammar and at ease

    Hi,

    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I understand No.1

    No.2
    This is from the dictionary:

    definitive adjective 1(of an answer, verdict, etc.) conclusive, decisive, final. Often confused in this sense with definite, which does not have connotations of authority and conclusiveness: a definite no is a firm refusal whereas a definitive no is an authoritative judgement or decision that something is not at ease

    Looking forward to hearing from you.
    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang


    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    No.1
    _______________ there, he found a great deal to interest him.

    a. This being his first visit <nominal>
    b. This being his first time to visit <absolute, to-infinitive = unrealized>
    c. This being his first time visiting <gerund; -ing = realized>

    No.2
    What's the context?

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    #4

    Re: grammar and at ease

    When something is not at ease it means the situation or condition is neither relaxed nor comfortable.

    Try this definition from definite - Definitions from Dictionary.com
    Usage Note: Definite and definitive both apply to what is precisely defined or explicitly set forth. But definitive most often refers specifically to a judgment or description that serves as a standard or reference point for others, as in the definitive decision of the court (which sets forth a final resolution of a judicial matter) or the definitive biography of Nelson (that is, the biography that sets the standard against which all other accounts of Nelson's life must be measured).
    Chinese (Simplified):松快地Chinese (Traditional):松快地

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    #5

    Re: grammar and at ease

    Hi,

    I didn't expected you know Chinese!
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see. However I don't understand your Chinese examples.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    When something is not at ease it means the situation or condition is neither relaxed nor comfortable.

    Try this definition from definite - Definitions from Dictionary.com
    Usage Note: Definite and definitive both apply to what is precisely defined or explicitly set forth. But definitive most often refers specifically to a judgment or description that serves as a standard or reference point for others, as in the definitive decision of the court (which sets forth a final resolution of a judicial matter) or the definitive biography of Nelson (that is, the biography that sets the standard against which all other accounts of Nelson's life must be measured).
    Chinese (Simplified):松快地Chinese (Traditional):松快地

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: grammar and at ease

    Quote Originally Posted by jiang View Post
    Hi,

    I didn't expected you know Chinese!
    Thank you very much for your explanation. Now I see. However I don't understand your Chinese examples.

    Have a nice weekend.

    Jiang
    Thanks, and they're not my Chinese definitions. They're from the link provided above.

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    #7

    Re: grammar and at ease

    Oh, I see.
    Jiang
    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Thanks, and they're not my Chinese definitions. They're from the link provided above.

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