Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 431
    #1

    "Denied" used in passive

    As persons deprived of memory become disoriented and lost, not knowing where they have been and where they are going, so a nation denied a conception of the past willbe disabled in dealing with its present and its future


    Question: The verb "denied" is in passive. What if the sentence is paraphrased as "a nation having no conception of the past"? What is the potential problem, as on the surface, I don't see an important difference?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: "Denied" used in passive

    There is a conceptual difference between not having something and being denied something. The latter implies a strong negative action.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Dec 2006
    • Posts: 431
    #3

    Re: "Denied" used in passive

    Quote Originally Posted by Anglika View Post
    There is a conceptual difference between not having something and being denied something. The latter implies a strong negative action.
    Thanks. It seems the two verbs tell the difference, but in this case, denied by whom?

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: "Denied" used in passive

    Quote Originally Posted by ian2 View Post
    Thanks. It seems the two verbs tell the difference, but in this case, denied by whom?
    The answer depends on the context. For example, at the time when Mr Baker was Minister for Education and introduced the National Curriculum (he is long gone from the political scene, but his name lives on in the staff development days, properly called 'inset' days, but known colloquially - particularly among older staff - as 'Baker days'), hostile press reports might have said people in schools were being denied exposure to music (because music became optional). Further changes have been made over the years; the latest and most lamentable being that a modern foreign language becomes optional after the age of 14; but don't get me started...)

    b

Similar Threads

  1. passive
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 11-Jan-2008, 01:48
  2. Are these passive sentences correct?
    By shuja87 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Dec-2006, 19:44
  3. What is different between perfect tense and passive voice?
    By callonghouse in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Mar-2006, 04:13
  4. organization
    By Aldana in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Dec-2005, 11:20
  5. passives
    By Anonymous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Feb-2003, 15:54

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •