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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    cove

    Hi guys
    by chance I mentioned a word cove under a different topic.
    Later on I realized the word deserve to be discused under its own.
    Some things about the word are not clear to me. I am sure this will help me to solve out all my doubts about it.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #2

    Re: cove

    Sure, what questions did you have about cove? And what's the context?

  2. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: cove

    Is this sentence correct?

    Have you seen those coves recently?


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    #4

    Re: cove

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    Is this sentence correct?

    Have you seen those coves recently?
    What could be wrong with it? What is 'coves' here - bays or people?

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: cove

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    Hi guys
    by chance I mentioned a word cove under a different topic.
    Later on I realized the word deserve to be discused under its own.
    Some things about the word are not clear to me. I am sure this will help me to solve out all my doubts about it.
    Hi, e2e4,
    These are the two definitions for "cove", does this answer your questions?

    cove 1 Noun
    a small bay or inlet [Old English cofa]
    cove 2 Noun
    Old-fashioned, slang a fellow; chap [probably from Romany kova]
    Collins Essential English Dictionary 2nd Edition 2006 HarperCollins Publishers 2004, 2006

  4. Senior Member
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    #6
    No, bhaisahab, it doesn't.

    If we talk about a bay as a cove, is it a special bay? (not usual)
    If we talk about a guy as a cove, is it a special guy? (not usual)

    The word maybe carries something what is not given in dictionaries.
    The guy might have been different to chaps or fellows if we said that cove and not a chap or a fellow.

    I know we can say

    These chaps, fellows etc but can we talk about coves or about a cove (a single one) only.

    Does it have plural form actually? Do we use it?
    If the word is used in its plural form (coves) then we wouldn't talk about a cove but ordinary chaps.
    Or there is no any special meaning with the word.

    That's my dilema at the moment.

  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: cove

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    No, bhaisahab, it doesn't.

    If we talk about a bay as a cove, is it a special bay? (not usual)
    If we talk about a guy as a cove, is it a special guy? (not usual)

    The word maybe carries something what is not given in dictionaries.
    The guy might have been different to chaps or fellows if we said that cove and not a chap or a fellow.

    I know we can say

    These chaps, fellows etc but can we talk about coves or about a cove (a single one) only.

    Does it have plural form actually? Do we use it?
    If the word is used in its plural form (coves) then we wouldn't talk about a cove but ordinary chaps.
    Or there is no any special meaning with the word.

    That's my dilema at the moment.
    To the best of my knowledge 'cove' in the sense of a person is neutral, i.e. neither good nor bad, the same as 'guy/chap' etc.
    As for 'cove' in the sense of a geographical feature, it means a small bay.
    It can be used in it's plural form in both cases.

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    #8

    Re: cove

    Not a teacher, but…

    I'm British, and would say that the word "cove" today is mainly used to mean "bay". Any bay, not a special bay. (Just to be clear, I mean a bay in the sense of "land/sea interface", not parking bay, loading bay etc).

    Cove in the sense of "guy" is a rare use, and is (as far as I know) old-fashioned. The first (and only) time I came across this use of the word was in "Black Ajax" a novel by George MacDonald Fraser, which referred to gentlemen adept in the art of boxing as "milling coves". The book is based in the early 19th century, and the phrase dates from that time. I doubt if anyone would refer to anybody as a cove nowadays.
    Last edited by hotmetal; 10-Jun-2008 at 15:41. Reason: Clarification of bay.

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