Results 1 to 10 of 10

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    Love (and its modifiers)

    I've never been a grammarian. I have a pretty good ear, though. Would someone be so kind as to parse the following ("passive voice" is all I am coming up with - and not even sure that is correct...):

    I love you.

    I have love for you.

    I still have love for you.

    Thanks!

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    re: Love (and its modifiers)

    These are all simple present tense:

    1. I love you.
    2. I have love for you.
    3. I still have love for you.

    The subjects are "I", the verbs are "love" (1.) and "have" (2. and 3.), the verb's objects are "you" (1.)and "love" (2. and 3.). The word "still" (3.) is an adverb, and "for you" (2. and 3.) is a prepositional phrase.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    #3

    re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Thanks, Soup. I did ask for grammar parsing, didn't I? And that's what you provided. I was imprecise, however. What I am interested to know is grammar of usage, more than of 'the rules, parts of speech', if that makes sense. And the semantics involved, too. In written dialog, doesn't the word "have" convert the basic active statement of #1 to passive voice, & should that passive voice be avoided always or is it contextual. "Have" takes the blood out of the communication, doesn't it?

  2. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #4

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Using the word "have" does not make a sentence passive voice. Instead, the subject has to be acted upon (instead of being the actor). That is accomplished by using a form of the verb "to be" and a form of another verb (usually in the past tense). Examples:
    I am loved.
    I am loved by somebody.
    The work was done.
    The work was done by the employees.
    Last edited by RonBee; 19-Jun-2008 at 09:01. Reason: add "being"


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    #5

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Thankyou, RonBee. Still come away with the connotation that "have" exsanguinates the sentiment....

  3. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #6

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    What is meant by "I have love for you"?



    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    #7

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Certainly something other than the same sentence sans "have". Declaratory & disclaimatory simultaneously. I havent thought of the word "doublespeak" in a long time....

  4. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #8

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Frankly, "I have love for you" means nothing to me. If I could see it in context I might be able to make sense out of it.


  5. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #9

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    lenolate, all three examples are in active voice; i.e., not one is in passive voice.
    [1] I love you.
    [2] I have love for you.
    The difference is in the structure: love; have + love:
    have, to hold or possess, either in a concrete or an abstract sense; to show, use or exhibit in action or words; e.g., have compassion.

    love, to hold or possess a deep affection for (e.g., someone).

    have + love, to hold or possess a deep affection for (e.g., someone).
    Love, vb. [1], is more economical being one word and so more exact in meaning than have + love, which given its structure--love, n. [2], is secondary, not primary--appears to make the sentiment rather distant and less personal, and perhaps the reason you feel it "takes the blood out".
    ________________
    By the way, what does that idiom mean?


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 5
    #10

    Re: Love (and its modifiers)

    Thanks, Soup. My thoughts, too, "Have" telescopes "love". "Doublespeak"? I always associated it with Orwell (1984) - but apparently imprecisely:Doublespeak - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •