Results 1 to 4 of 4
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Thai
      • Home Country:
      • Thailand
      • Current Location:
      • Thailand

    • Join Date: Dec 2003
    • Posts: 287
    #1

    soiled and scuffed

    Hello there,

    5 questions to ask:

    1) The book's binding was of an ordinary 19th century style, soiled and scuffed.

    Do you know what kind of soiled and scuffed binding style like? or it just means that the binding is dirty and rotten because of its old age??

    2) The UN thought it was doing Bosnia a favor, funding the work so that the haggadah could be properly displayed. But when it comes to national treasures, no one want outsiders calling the shots. Ozren clearly felt he'd been sidelined.

    What does "sidelined" here mean? Ozren felt he was removed from this project?? By the way, Ozren is the curator who secured the haggadah in Bosnia.

    3) I realized a long time ago that she would never respect me for choosing to be a repairer of books rather than bodies. For her, my double-honors degrees in chemistry and ancient Near Eastern languages might as well have been used Kleenex. A masters in chemistry and a PhD in fine art conservation didn't cut it, either.

    Pls help explain the red sentence, I think it's metaphor but I didn't get it. Kleenex paper tissue?? or rubble glove?? or what?

    4) The old book must be stabilized physically and mechanically. Anyone can explain me in more details?

    5) Never mistake yourself for an artist. You must be always behind your object.

    If "you" here is a book conservator, "object" here is to conserve the book's original conditions, right? "object" here is like "aim" or "purpose", right?

    Thank you!!!


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 25
    #2

    Re: soiled and scuffed

    1) The book's binding was of an ordinary 19th century style, soiled and scuffed.

    Do you know what kind of soiled and scuffed binding style like? or it just means that the binding is dirty and rotten because of its old age??

    I'm not positive, but I think you're right to guess that the binding was dirty and heavily used from old age.



    2) The UN thought it was doing Bosnia a favor, funding the work so that the haggadah could be properly displayed. But when it comes to national treasures, no one want outsiders calling the shots. Ozren clearly felt he'd been sidelined.

    What does "sidelined" here mean? Ozren felt he was removed from this project?? By the way, Ozren is the curator who secured the haggadah in Bosnia.

    I think you're right again! In sports, being on the sidelines means that you are not playing, but you are watching the game. So to be 'sidelined' means that you are not removed from the work.

    3) I realized a long time ago that she would never respect me for choosing to be a repairer of books rather than bodies. For her, my double-honors degrees in chemistry and ancient Near Eastern languages might as well have been used Kleenex. A masters in chemistry and a PhD in fine art conservation didn't cut it, either.

    Pls help explain the red sentence, I think it's metaphor but I didn't get it. Kleenex paper tissue?? or rubble glove?? or what?

    Yes, the author is using sarcasm. Kleenex is the paper tissue, and a used one is... well, a dirty Kleenex. The author has a degree in chemistry and ancient Near Eastern languages, but 'she' doesn't care. (Just like she wouldn't care about a dirty Kleenex).

    4) The old book must be stabilized physically and mechanically. Anyone can explain me in more details?

    Unfortunately, I don't know what he means. He is describing how the book needs to be fixed.

    5) Never mistake yourself for an artist. You must be always behind your object.

    If "you" here is a book conservator, "object" here is to conserve the book's original conditions, right? "object" here is like "aim" or "purpose", right?

    'You' is a book conservator and 'object' is the book that you are fixing. So the author says that the work that you do as a book conservator must not stand out above the original work.

    For example, if someone looks at the book and says "Wow, this book looks great!" You didn't do a good job. The person should look at the importance of the book itself. Not the repair job that you did on it.

    Hope that helps!


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: soiled and scuffed

    'soiled and scuffed.' : dirty, and with marks made when something has scraped or rubbed against the cover

    sidelined: comes from sport, where a player is caused to be unable to play on a team or in a game : "He has been sidelined for the last six weeks with a fractured wrist."
    • Figuratively, as in your sentence, it means to remove from the center of activity or attention; place in a less influential position so your opinion is not taken into consideration - you no longer have any say in the matter.

    Kleenex: when one is award a degree, one receives a testamur, the piece of paper from the University indicating the degree award and the University crest, date etc. He has two. But for all they are giving him credit for, those two testamurs are being regardded as worthless as if they were two pieces of used Kleenex tissue.

    stabilized physically and mechanically: old books are affected by chemicals in the air, sunlight etc, and because of their age, the paper is brittle. So before they can be studied in ordinary light, and actually handled, both these problems need to be addressed as part of the preservation and restoration.

    object: by the time I got to this Takezo had also posted...and I couldn't improve on his/her excellent explanation for this one.
    Last edited by David L.; 16-Jun-2008 at 08:10.

  1. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #4

    Re: soiled and scuffed

    And the word "mechanically" is probably used specifically to refer to the moving parts of the binding - can you use the book without damaging the spine/binding? Particularly vulnerable moving parts are:
    • the thread that is used to stitch the pages together (in a traditionally bound book - the sort that museums bother to conserve!)

    • the 'end-papers' - thicker paper that attaches the cover to the spine

    • the flexible glue, that bends slightly as the pages move; with time it becomes brittle and stops being 'a moving part' at all!


    b
    Last edited by BobK; 16-Jun-2008 at 11:27.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •