Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #1

    I should = you should?

    I have someone here for you. I should come and pick him up straight away.


    The sentence above comes from COLLINS ENGLISH USAGE, contained in the section of ADVISING SOMEONE.

    Then can we say this sentence means 'If I were you, I should come and pick him up straight away.' ? or:
    'You should come and pick him up straight away'?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by joham; 18-Jun-2008 at 12:04. Reason: changed to another sentence.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #2

    Re: I should = you should?

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    I have someone here for you. I should come and pick him up straight away.


    The sentence above comes from COLLINS ENGLISH USAGE, contained in the section of ADVISING SOMEONE.

    Then can we say this sentence means 'If I were you, I should come and pick him up straight away.' ? or:
    'You should come and pick him up straight away'?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.
    It means 'If I were you, I should come and pick him up straight away.' but it could also mean 'You should come and pick him up straight away' both sentences mean more or less the same thing put in a different way.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,618
    #3

    Re: I should = you should?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    It means 'If I were you, I should come and pick him up straight away.' but it could also mean 'You should come and pick him up straight away' both sentences mean more or less the same thing put in a different way.
    Then it should be the same with the following question?

    I should watch it, Neil, you're putting this on record.

    The sentence above comes from COLLINS ENGLISH USAGE, contained in the section of WARNING SOMEONE.


    Then can we say this sentence means 'If I were you, I should watch it, Neil, you’re putting this on record' and also 'You should watch it, Neil, you’re putting this on record'?

    Thank you in advance.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,626
    #4

    Re: I should = you should?

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Then it should be the same with the following question?

    I should watch it, Neil, you're putting this on record.

    The sentence above comes from COLLINS ENGLISH USAGE, contained in the section of WARNING SOMEONE.


    Then can we say this sentence means 'If I were you, I should watch it, Neil, you’re putting this on record' and also 'You should watch it, Neil, you’re putting this on record'?

    Thank you in advance.
    Yes.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 80
    #5

    American Usage: I should = you should?

    I have someone here for you. I should come and pick him up straight away.

    American English uses would for the conditional, for all persons (I/you/we would):
    If I were you, I would come and pick him up right away.

    For us, should means obligation (ought to):
    I should come and pick him up right away. If I don't, he might get wet and catch a cold waiting out in the rain.


Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •