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    #1

    morphosyntactic features

    can ne1 tell me what morpho=syntactic features are with examples?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    See here.

    <a href="http://www.thefreedictionary.com/Morphosyntactic">morphosyntax</a>

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    #3

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah b View Post
    can ne1 tell me what morpho=syntactic features are with examples?
    The following features are, or can be, morphosyntactic:

    -- gender
    -- number
    -- person
    -- case
    -- definiteness
    -- tense
    -- aspect
    -- mood

    For explanations with examples, click here.


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    #4

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    so are morphosyntactic features very similar to verb agreement then? For instance, is it possible to say; the addition of the morphosyntactic 's' suffix in the sentence the childs book enables the verb agreement?

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    #5

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah b View Post
    For instance, is it possible to say; the addition of the morphosyntactic 's' suffix in the sentence the childs book enables the verb agreement?
    Child's book is a possessive noun phrase and houses an example of a morpho-syntactic feature. Note that, there is no verb agreement there.

    Did you have a chance to read the information I provided via the link in post #3? If not, maybe this will help:
    Paradigms and Morphosyntax

    A paradigm is the complete set of related word-forms associated with a given lexeme. The familiar examples of paradigms are the conjugations of verbs, and the declensions of nouns. Accordingly, the word-forms of a lexeme may be arranged conveniently into tables, by classifying them according to shared inflectional categories such as tense, aspect, mood, number, gender or case. For example, the personal pronouns in English can be organized into tables, using the categories of person (1st., 2nd., 3rd.), number (singular vs. plural), gender (masculine, feminine, neuter), and case (subjective, objective, and possessive). See English personal pronouns for the details.

    The inflectional categories used to group word-forms into paradigms cannot be chosen arbitrarily; they must be categories that are relevant to stating the syntactic rules of the language. For example, person and number are categories that can be used to define paradigms in English, because English has grammatical agreement rules that require the verb in a sentence to appear in an inflectional form that matches the person and number of the subject. In other words, the syntactic rules of English care about the difference between dog and dogs, because the choice between these two forms determines which form of the verb is to be used. In contrast, however, no syntactic rule of English cares about the difference between dog and dog-catcher, or dependent and independent. The first two are just nouns, and the second two just adjectives, and they generally behave like any other noun or adjective behaves.

    An important difference between inflection and word-formation is that inflected word-forms of lexemes are organized into paradigms, which are defined by the requirements of syntactic rules, whereas the rules of word-formation are not restricted by any corresponding requirements of syntax. Inflection is therefore said to be relevant to syntax, and word-formation is not. The part of morphology that covers the relationship between syntax and morphology is called morphosyntax, and it concerns itself with inflection and paradigms, but not with word-formation or compounding.

    Morphology (linguistics - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)


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    #6

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Sorry I must be going mad! Of course there is no verb agreement in a phrase which consists of no verb!! So in my example, 'The child's book' the use of the 's' suffix is the morphosyntactic paradigm of the genitive case??

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    #7

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah b View Post
    Sorry I must be going mad! Of course there is no verb agreement in a phrase which consists of no verb!! So in my example, 'The child's book' the use of the 's' suffix is the morphosyntactic paradigm of the genitive case??
    It's a possessive suffix--some go so far as to call it the head of a PossP (possessive phrase). It functions at the morphosyntactic interface, and it's not a paradigm. A paradigm looks like this:
    I am
    you are
    she is
    ...



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    #8

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    This is all very complicated! so are morphosynyactic features just morphemes which enable the formation of a grammastically correct syntax? And are paradigms only to do with person? Sorry for all the questions I'm just really not getting this!

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    #9

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah b View Post
    This is all very complicated! so are morphosynyactic features just morphemes which enable the formation of a grammastically correct syntax?
    Yes.

    Quote Originally Posted by sarah b
    And are paradigms only to do with person?
    Nope (See below). By the way, "case" as in, e.g., he, him, his:
    Case
    subject pronoun: he
    object pronoun: him
    possessive pronoun: his

    --------------------------

    Number and possession
    singular: child
    plural form: children
    possessive forms: child's, children's


    A paradigm is the complete set of related word-forms associated with a given lexeme. The familiar examples of paradigms are the conjugations of verbs, and the declensions of nouns. Accordingly, the word-forms of a lexeme may be arranged conveniently into tables, by classifying them according to shared inflectional categories such as tense, aspect, mood, number, gender or case. For example, the personal pronouns in English can be organized into tables, using the categories of person (1st., 2nd., 3rd.), number (singular vs. plural), gender (masculine, feminine, neuter), and case (subjective, objective, and possessive). See English personal pronouns for the details.


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    #10

    Re: morphosyntactic features

    Whoo I think I get it! thanks for all your help! one final question, does this sentence make sense;

    " 'she fell of she's chair' is grammatically incorrect because the possessive paradigm 'her' has been replaced with the nominative pronoun 'she' "

    ?

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