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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Hi!

    Hi,
    I am new here. English is my main language. I would say grammar and syntax are areas that I have to work on.
    Anyway, the following question has been bugging me for a while. I was writing an email to one of my friends saying,

    I appreciate you bringing this to my notice.

    Or is it?

    I appreciate your bringing this to my notice.

    Thanks in advance.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: Hi!

    Hello, and welcome.

    [1] I appreciate you bringing this to my notice.
    Meaning => I appreciate you for bringing this to my attention.

    [2] I appreciate your bringing this to my notice. <Standard>
    Meaning => I appreciate your action.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 1,571
    #3

    Re: Hi!

    We call these forms half-gerunds, as they allow fluctuations like him-his, you-your, etc.

    e.g. I remember him/his telling me about it.

    Unlike, for example, 'I saw him smoking', where 'smoking' is participle I (or present participle), as it's impossible to substitute the possessive pronoun 'his' for 'him' in this complex.


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 1
    #4

    Re: Hi!

    hello

    I am a student of English from oriental continent

    for the first time I come here

    my English is poor.

    I want to polish it

    My MSN is huyl2002(@)hotmail.com


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 2
    #5

    Re: Hi!

    Soup & Clark. Thanks for your clarifications. I was actually leaning towards I appreciate your bringing this to my notice. myself. Thanks for validating that.

    From the replies above I gather that both sentences are grammatically correct.
    So, usage depends on context. If I wanted to address the person I would use [1], if I wanted to address the action performed by the person I would use [2], right?

    I guess I am trying to understand why one sentence is the standard and the other not, when it's actually the context that decides usage.

    Thanks.

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