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    #1

    the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Have a look at (1).

    (1) As tired as I was, I fell asleep quickly that night.
    (V. Sherrard, Eyes of a Stalker)

    The author is a speaker of Canadian English. She uses (1) to mean (2).

    (2) Because I was tired, I fell asleep quickly that night.

    According to dictionaries, however, the underlined part in (1) should mean only "Though I was tired."

    My question is,
    Do speakers of other kinds of English think (1) works in the intended meaning of (2)?

    Thank you in advance
    Seiichi MYOGA


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    #2

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    In this case, it means because I was tired >> "As I was tired/Tired, I fell asleep quickly".

    I feel it is slightly awkward.

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    #3

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Dear Anglika,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    We learn here in Japan that "(as) tired as I was" would mean either "because I was tired" as in (3a) or "though I was tired" as in (3b).

    (3) a. (As) tired as I was, I fell asleep quickly that night.
    b. (As) tired as I was, I couldn't fall asleep quickly that night.

    I was surprised when I found English-English dictionaries only describe the latter usage. And I was more than surprised when I found (1).

    Now I'm wondering if something like (3a) is an American Engilsh style (if we broadly divide the Englishes into British and American English so as to avoid unnecessary complexities).

    Thank you

    Morrow


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    #4

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Quote Originally Posted by Seiichi MYOGA View Post
    Have a look at (1).

    (1) As tired as I was, I fell asleep quickly that night.
    (V. Sherrard, Eyes of a Stalker)

    The author is a speaker of Canadian English. She uses (1) to mean (2).

    (2) Because I was tired, I fell asleep quickly that night.

    According to dictionaries, however, the underlined part in (1) should mean only "Though I was tired."

    My question is,
    Do speakers of other kinds of English think (1) works in the intended meaning of (2)?

    Thank you in advance
    Seiichi MYOGA
    Good day, Seiichi.

    How have you determined that the author meant that of (2)?

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    #5

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    How have you determined that the author meant that of (2)?
    Are you saying that the author really meant "Though I was tired," riverkid?

    Tiredness is generally expected to account for the reason you fall asleep quickly. In other words, the cause-effect relation will hold between tiredness and your falling asleep quickly, and therefore for speakers who accept (2), it must mean "Because I was tired, I fell asleep quickly that night."

    Seiichi MYOGA

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    I find the usage far less as well. When I saw only the headline of your post, I was expecting to see people explain that it meant "Although I was tired, I still..." and give something in contrast to what you would have expected.

    It's not unheard of, of course, but certainly less common. I feel like it's more commonly used that way with a "you" rather than and "I" construction. "As dirty as you are, mister, you're getting in the tub before you play Nintendo."

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    #7

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    It's not unheard of, of course, but certainly less common.
    Dear Barb_D,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    So, it's not simply whether you are across the Atlantic Ocean or not.

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I feel like it's more commonly used that way with a "you" rather than and "I" construction. "As dirty as you are, mister, you're getting in the tub before you play Nintendo."
    This is off the topic, but can I ask something?

    You're using the progressive form in "you're getting."

    Is this because (you want to show) you're anticipating some reluctance on the part of your addressee to comply with your request?

    Seiichi MYOGA

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    #8

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    "I'm getting in the tub" is my intention to take a bath.

    "You're getting in the tub" is my stated intention that the person I'm talking to (in the example, the speaker's son) will take a bath.

    There are not many people you can speak to in that tense.


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    #9

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    Quote Originally Posted by Seiichi MYOGA View Post
    Are you saying that the author really meant "Though I was tired," riverkid?

    No, I didn't say that, Seiichi and I'm not saying that. I just asked how you determined the meaning of,

    (1) As tired as I was, I fell asleep quickly that night.
    (V. Sherrard, Eyes of a Stalker)


    Seiichi MYOGA
    #

  3. stuartnz's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: the meaning of "(as) tired as I was"

    I'm not a professional teacher, but after reading this whole thread, the problem I have with the phrase in question is that it seems to go against the normal pattern I would expect of the phrase "as (adjective) as I was, ..."

    If I read "As tired as I was, ", I would expect to read something like, "I still could not fall asleep". Similarly, I might say, "as hungry as I was, I just could not eat", or "as sad as I was, I could not cry". So As tired as I was, I fell asleep quickly that night.seems slightly unnatural to me.

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