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    #1

    behalf

    1- she testified on mat's behalf. = with/not against

    2- I spoke on behalf of my classmates about our problems. = instead of them.


    are these sentences correct in structer and meaning?if so, could someone give me another examples of how to use behalf?



    THANKS IN ADVANCE

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: behalf

    From § 169. in behalf of / on behalf of. 3. Word Choice. The American Heritage Book of English Usage. 1996
    A traditional rule holds that in behalf of and on behalf of have distinct meanings. Accordingly, you should use in behalf of to mean “for the benefit of,” as in We raised money in behalf of the earthquake victims. And you should use on behalf of to mean “as the agent of, on the part of,” as in The guardian signed the contract on behalf of the child. But as the two meanings are quite close, the phrases are often used interchangeably, even by reputable writers.
    From Lynch's Guide to Grammar and Style
    Traditionalists observe a distinction between in behalf of and on behalf of. The former means "for the benefit of": you might write a letter of recommendation in behalf of a colleague, or raise money in behalf of hurricane victims. The latter means "on the part of" or "as the agent of": a lawyer acts on behalf of her client, or the producer may accept an award on behalf of the cast. [Entry added 31 Oct. 2006.]
    From The Grammar Logs -- Number Two Hundred, Eighty-Seven
    This is what the online Merriam Webster's has to say about it:
    A body of opinion favors in with the "interest, benefit" sense of behalf and on with the "support, defense" sense. This distinction has been observed by some writers but overall has never had a sound basis in actual usage. In current British use, on behalf (of) has replaced in behalf (of); both are still used in American English, but the distinction is frequently not observed.
    Burchfield says that in British English, only "on behalf of" is used.

    The New Fowler's Modern English Usage edited by R.W. Burchfield. Clarendon Press: Oxford, England. 1996.


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    #3

    Re: behalf

    wow intresting i never knew that.

    1- - she testified in mat's behalf. (correction)


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    #4

    Re: behalf

    HI
    i just got a new question

    on behalf of my friend and I/me thank you for your compliment.

    which i one should use me or i?

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: behalf

    Burchfield came from New Zealand, but I never held that against him! But, as Editor-in-Chief for the OED for many years, his views on British English are pretty reliable. I've heard many people say 'in behalf of', but I always suspected them of a certain transatlantic-ness. I didn't realize that in formal American usage that (useful) distinction is made, and I'm pretty sure that British speakers who ape the 'American' usage don't either!

    So thanks for the info.

    b

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: behalf

    Quote Originally Posted by fantastic View Post
    HI
    i just got a new question

    on behalf of my friend and I/me thank you for your compliment.

    which i one should use me or i?
    The rule is quite simple: if the speaker is the subject of the sentence or a part of the subject, use I and if the object or part of the object, use me. If you're not sure, try it without the other person and you won't ever get it wrong.

    Ex: On behalf of I
    Ex: On my behalf
    Ex: On behalf of my friend and me
    Ex: On behalf of my friend and I <hypercorrection>
    Hypercorrection means being so concerned with getting the grammar right that you get it wrong. For instance, we have it drilled into our heads that "Me and him went to the game" is wrong; it should be "He and I went to the game." Too many people end up thinking "He and I" is therefore more proper, and use it in inappropriate places, like "A message came for he and I" — it should be "A message came for him and me."

    Lynch, Guide to Grammar and Style — H
    ______________
    Here's a related question, and its answer, from WORD COURT ARCHIVES.
    Cameron Seybolt, of Wayzata, Minn., writes: “One of my law partners tells me there is a grammatical error in a legal document that says, ‘The Personal Representative may file joint income tax returns on behalf of me and my spouse.’ I agree that ‘on behalf of my spouse and me’ would sound better, but in my view, the former is not necessarily wrong. I told this to my colleague, and you would have thought I challenged his religious beliefs. What do you say?”


    Dear Cameron: You’re right that the sentence doesn’t violate any rule of grammar. Putting oneself second, or last -- as in “my spouse and me” or “my spouse, our children and me” -- is a matter of etiquette, like opening a door and letting the other family members go through first.

    I agree with both you and your colleague, though, that “on behalf of me and my spouse” sounds egregious. Part of the problem is that one would never say “on behalf of (just) me” -- it would be “on my behalf.” Since “on behalf of me” sounds terrible, and “me and my spouse” sounds bad too, “on behalf of me and my spouse” doesn’t have much going for it except, presumably, that the focus of the legal document is the person signing it and therefore, in context, bringing up the spouse first is a bit odd. How would you feel about “on my behalf and that of my spouse”?


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    #7

    Re: behalf

    To avoid the risk of hypercorrection there is the loathesome/lamentable trick of using 'myself' instead of either 'me' or 'I'. I received some e-mail the other day that started with these unpromising words:
    It has been made aware to myself that ...
    To quote Shakespeare: 'Horrible - most horrible.'

    b

  5. Soup's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: behalf

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    To avoid the risk of hypercorrection there is the loathesome/lamentable trick of using 'myself' instead of either 'me' or 'I'. I received some e-mail the other day that started with these unpromising words:

    To quote Shakespeare: 'Horrible - most horrible.'

    b

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