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    #1

    can't help do sth

    Don't take the medicine. It can't help _____ rid of your cold.
    A. getting B. to get C. to getting D. gets

    The given answer is B. But I thought the sentence was Chinglish. I searched the BNC and CAE and found no such sentences. (But I found on the reference.com 'Despise all that, we couldn’t help do what we felt the Spirit called us to do. ')


    And I was surprised to find in the corpuses a few sentences with the structure of 'couldn't help notice/ feel', which I thought should have been 'couldn't help noticing/feeling'.

    Am I right? Could I ask native English teachers to help me please?
    Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by joham; 22-Jun-2008 at 03:04. Reason: one sentence added

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    #2

    Re: can't help do sth

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Don't take the medicine. It can't help _____ rid of your cold.
    A. getting B. to get C. to getting D. gets

    The given answer is B. But I thought the sentence was Chinglish. I searched the BNC and CAE and found no such sentences. (But I found on the reference.com 'Despise all that, we couldn’t help do what we felt the Spirit called us to do. ')


    And I was surprised to find in the corpuses a few sentences with the structure of 'couldn't help notice/ feel', which I thought should have been 'couldn't help noticing/feeling'.

    Am I right? Could I ask native English teachers to help me please?
    Thank you in advance.
    I agree that the sentence seems a bit strange, and I don't really like it with any of the choices.
    I think the best sentence would be, 'It (won't)(can't) help you get rid of your cold.'

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    #3

    Re: can't help do sth

    Thanks, 2006. Then does the following sentence sound fine to you native speakers? Do native speakers use 'can't/couldn't help do sth' structures?

    Sorry, I can't help get in the crops.
    Thanks again.
    Last edited by joham; 22-Jun-2008 at 07:15. Reason: sentence changed.

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    #4

    Re: can't help do sth

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Thanks, 2006. Then does the following sentence sound fine to you native speakers? Do native speakers use 'can't/couldn't help do sth' structures? yes

    Sorry, I can't help get in the crops.
    Sorry, I can't help (you/them) get the crops in.
    2006


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    #5

    Re: can't help do sth

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Don't take the medicine. It can't help _____ rid of your cold.
    A. getting B. to get C. to getting D. gets

    The given answer is B. But I thought the sentence was Chinglish. I searched the BNC and CAE and found no such sentences.

    I don't think that B sounds so terribly bad. I was going to say that the collocation with the addition of 'you', likely more widespread, probably made the other sound "unnatural" but the results don't seem to bear that out.

    Results 1 - 10 of about 48 English pages for "it can't help you to".

    Results 1 - 10 of about 339 English pages for "it can't help to".



    (But I found on the reference.com 'Despise all that, we couldn’t help do what we felt the Spirit called us to do. ')

    And I was surprised to find in the corpuses a few sentences with the structure of 'couldn't help notice/ feel', which I thought should have been 'couldn't help noticing/feeling'.

    Clearly, English has both the infinitive and the ing form. A more common collocation than, 'couldn't help notice/ feel', is

    'couldn't help but notice/feel'.

    I agree that for some verbs at least, the 'ing' form sounds better. With the addition of 'but', they sound more natural.


    Am I right? Could I ask native English teachers to help me please?
    Thank you in advance.
    #

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