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    #1

    number or rate, or both?

    I wonder what "more" may mean in (1) and (2).

    (1) Today, more women go to college than (they did) thirty years ago.
    (2) Today, more women go to college than men (do).

    What word would you insert into [ A ] and [ B ]?

    (3) Today, the [ A ] of women who go to college is [ B ] than (it was) thirty years ago.
    (4) Today, the [ A ] of women who go to college is [ B ] than that of men (is).

    I think the possible pair of [ A ] and [ B ] is either [number] and [larger] or [rate (or proportion)] and [higher], both in (3) and (4).

    Do you agree?

    Thank you in advance
    Seiichi MYOGA


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    #2

    Re: number or rate, or both?

    Where did you find these sentences?

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: number or rate, or both?

    Quote Originally Posted by Seiichi MYOGA View Post
    I wonder what "more" may mean in (1) and (2).

    (1) Today, more women go to college than (they did) thirty years ago.
    (2) Today, more women go to college than men (do).
    more = a greater number of
    For the second one I would say:
    Today, more women than men go to college.

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    #4

    Re: number or rate, or both?

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    For the second one I would say:
    Today, more women than men go to college.
    Dear RonBee,

    I appreciate your help and comments.

    Usually, English comparatives have two types of usage (for the sake of simplicity, we exclude superlatives). One is a comparison between one entity and another entity that belongs to the same category. And the other is a comaprison between two qualities of the same entity. (5a) is an example of the former usage and (5b) is one of the latter.

    (5) a. John is as strong as Ken is.
    b. John is as strong as (he was) ten years ago.

    What I wanted to be sure of is whether the "More ...+VP" construction as in (6) has the same trait.

    (6) Today, more women go to college.

    I'd appreciate it if you could help us again about whether (7a) and (7b) are "acceptable" or not.

    (7) a. Today, more women go to college than men.
    b. Today, more women go to college than men do.

    Seiichi MYOGA

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