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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #1

    in day vs at day

    if i have a workshop and i want to say that in day 1 i'll do so and so should it be "in day 1" or "at day 1"

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in day vs at day

    Like this? I'll do it in a day or so.

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    #3

    Re: in day vs at day

    On Day 1, I'll do cutting and drilling work.

    Just as you say : On Monday, Tuesday..

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: in day vs at day

    Quote Originally Posted by thomasRavenelli View Post
    if i have a workshop and i want to say that in day 1 i'll do so and so should it be "in day 1" or "at day 1"
    As I understand, You want to do and complete the work on the day 1 or 1st day, then in that case it will be; I will do so on the day1.

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: in day vs at day

    Neither . 'On day one'.

    You can use 'in' with an expression of a period - either 'in ten days', or [a totally different usage] 'in the daytime'.

    Another way of saying 'in the daytime' is 'by day': 'He crossed the desert on foot, sleeping by day and travelling by/at night'.

    Strangely, 'at' collocates with 'night' but not 'day' (to my ear).

    b


    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #6

    Re: in day vs at day

    thanks all for your help. Soup said something that I wasn't asking about when he said : I'll do it in a day or so. Bobk is saying that "in" can't be used with days . Does this mean that "I'll do it in a day or so " is wrong?


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #7

    Re: in day vs at day

    Quote Originally Posted by thomasRavenelli View Post
    thanks all for your help. Soup said something that I wasn't asking about when he said : I'll do it in a day or so. Bobk is saying that "in" can't be used with days . Does this mean that "I'll do it in a day or so " is wrong?
    'In a day' means a time period between the present moment and the event in question.

  3. Soup's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: in day vs at day

    Quote Originally Posted by thomasRavenelli View Post
    thanks all for your help. Soup said something that I wasn't asking about when he said : I'll do it in a day or so. Bobk is saying that "in" can't be used with days . Does this mean that "I'll do it in a day or so " is wrong?
    In a day or so is correct. Bob was talking about a different structure/meaning. By the way, what meaning are you looking for?

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    #9

    Exclamation Re: in day vs at day

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Neither . 'On day one'.

    You can use 'in' with an expression of a period - either 'in ten days', or [a totally different usage] 'in the daytime'.

    Another way of saying 'in the daytime' is 'by day': 'He crossed the desert on foot, sleeping by day and travelling by/at night'.

    Strangely, 'at' collocates with 'night' but not 'day' (to my ear).

    b
    I agree with you that 'in' is used with an expression of a period, but what if it is precisely a day or a certain day? If the sentence - That happened on the 6th of June. is correct then what is wrong with - I will do it on the day one


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #10

    Re: in day vs at day

    Quote Originally Posted by Manas Ranjan Mallick View Post
    I agree with you that 'in' is used with an expression of a period, but what if it is precisely a day or a certain day? If the sentence - That happened on the 6th of June. is correct then what is wrong with - I will do it on the day one
    'On day one' is grammatically correct if you are talking about an event that lasted for several days. It's not about calender days.

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