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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Tuvalu
      • Current Location:
      • Tuvalu

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 1,860
    #1

    which verb, please?

    please, talking to the staff at the front desk of a hotel I would like to say the following sentence:

    "Please, I am looking for a lady in a group of young people who is ____ in this hotel. Her name is Manuela and I wonder if you could let me know her room number, please.".


    please, which word should I use to fill the blank?

    "lodged"?
    "staying"?
    "a guest"?

    thanks.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Chinese
      • Home Country:
      • China
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 468
    #2

    Re: which verb, please?

    Quote Originally Posted by jctgf View Post
    please, talking to the staff at the front desk of a hotel I would like to say the following sentence:

    "Please, I am looking for a lady in a group of young people who is ____ in this hotel. Her name is Manuela and I wonder if you could let me know her room number, please.".

    please, which word should I use to fill the blank?

    "lodged"?
    "staying"?
    "a guest"?

    thanks.
    It seems to me any of them is OK, but I still prefer "staying" personally.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #3

    Re: which verb, please?

    "...who is staying at this hotel" is appropriate for a hotel up to 3 stars if you are actually in the hotel and asking at the desk, or asking someone also staying in the hotel.

    4 stars+ : "...who is a guest at this hotel."
    Super-rich and super-swanky hotel: "...who is a guest with this hotel" - not likely to come out of my mouth...or, I guess, yours.

    Note: staying in this hotel.

    "The action of the plot now shifts to the Mayfair Hotel, and to Lady Cynthia who is staying in this hotel with her mother, the Dowager Duchess..."

    'in' is used to locate the action firmly to 'inside' the hotel, whereas 'at' is used to indicate a more general idea of location.
    He is at school.
    Children should not talk in school/class.

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