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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    mad relatives & fashionable

    Dear Teachers,

    I read these from True Pleasures by Lucinda Holdforth:

    1.
    "I was accepted into the Foreign Affairs Department in 1987... our training course topics included Diplomatic dinners: how to make people feel at home who you wish were at home and What to do when Australians send their mad relatives to YOUR post."

    What does "post" mean here? Why are YOUR typed in capital letters?

    2.
    "Madame du Deffand and Voltaire shared a particular loathing for the fashionable philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau."

    What does "fashionable" mean here? That Rousseau was popular in his age?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: mad relatives & fashionable

    Quote Originally Posted by Eway View Post
    Dear Teachers,

    I read these from True Pleasures by Lucinda Holdforth:

    1.
    "I was accepted into the Foreign Affairs Department in 1987... our training course topics included Diplomatic dinners: how to make people feel at home who you wish were at home and What to do when Australians send their mad relatives to YOUR post."

    What does "post" mean here? Why are YOUR typed in capital letters?

    2.
    "Madame du Deffand and Voltaire shared a particular loathing for the fashionable philosopher, Jean-Jacques Rousseau."

    What does "fashionable" mean here? That Rousseau was popular in his age?
    In this context I would say that "post" means your posting, in the Diplomatic service, I believe, one is sent on a "posting" where one holds a post in an embassy or similar. Your is in capitals to emphasise that is your particular post that receives the "mad Australians".

    "Fashionable" here does indeed mean that Rousseau was popular in his age as you have surmised.

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