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  1. mylevt's Avatar
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    #1

    go right

    Hi,
    "When nothing seems to go right."
    Please tell me if "go" means "change" and "right" is an adjective which means "correct".
    Thanks.


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #2

    Re: go right

    Quote Originally Posted by mylevt View Post
    Hi,
    "When nothing seems to go right."
    Please tell me if "go" means "change" and "right" is an adjective which means "correct".
    Thanks.
    'Right' is an adjective here. The meaning of 'go' is semantically reduced to that of a link-verb, i.e. to go right =(nearly)= to be right. There is a little difference, of course, 'to go' gives some dynamics to the scene.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #3
    Go means happen, and right means (in) the way I expect (it to happen).

    go right, to happen as expected, wanted or intended; to be successful or without problems. Example: Nothing ever goes right for him. go right - Definitions from Dictionary.com

    ________________
    Clark, I've a question too. What test determines the function of right? Adjectives, not adverbs, are used after the verb seem; however, right occurs after go. That is, the meaning is go right, not seems right. Or is it that to go functions as a nominative absolute phrase (an object) and therefore takes an adjective?


    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #4

    Re: go right

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Clark, I've a question too. What test determines the function of right? Adjectives, not adverbs, are used after the verb seem; however, right occurs after go. That is, the meaning is go right, not seems right. Or is it that to go functions as a nominative absolute phrase (an object) and therefore takes an adjective?
    I think the function (or rather, the morphological status) of 'right' should be determined within the phrase 'to go right', the outer environment doesn't matter. We can place it in different syntactical structures, and it won't give us anything.
    e.g. If you want things to go right, ...
    If everything goes right, ...
    Things will go right if you ...
    etc.

    To decide whether 'right' is an adj or an adv, let's substitute other adj/adv for it in the expression 'to go right':

    If things go wonderful/wonderfully, ... .

    So if you choose 'wonderful', then 'right' is an adj, if 'wonderfully', then it's an adverb.
    You make a decision.

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