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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    show favoritism toward someone

    Hi,

    The art teacher shows partiality toward(s) those who are interested in paintings.
    The art teacher shows preference toward(s) those who are interested in paintings.
    The art teacher shows favoritism toward(s) those who are interested in paintings.


    Do you see any difference in meaning? Would the green one be in more common use than the rest?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: show favoritism toward someone

    It would more usually be

    "The art teacher favoured those....",
    "The art teacher shows a preference for those...", or
    "The art teacher has a partiality for those...".


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #3

    Re: show favoritism toward someone

    Anglika:
    Thank you for telling me some good phrases.
    Are the examples in my last post difficult to understand, or is it just that they don't sound natural?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #4

    Re: show favoritism toward someone

    The first two are fine, but rather pedantic. The third sounds wrong.

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