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  1. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #1

    where is the 'from'

    Hi, Teacher.

    The following dialog is from a tapescript.

    A: What do you want to be doing five years from now?
    B: Well, ... uh ... five years from now I'd like to be a father of five. I'd like to have lots of kids around the house.

    When I listened to the dialog, which was spoken by two native speakers, I could not hear the word from. Every time, I could only hear 'five years now'. Can the froms be omited in such cases in spoken English?

    Thanks in advance.
    Enydia

  2. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Hi enydia

    As a Brit and mentor, but not a teacher:

    The "from" should not be ommitted.

    What you may be hearing (or miss-hearing) is "from" being typically pronounced, by an NES as if it were spelt "frm" (or "frum").

    Hope this helps.
    NT

  3. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #3

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    Hi enydia

    As a Brit and mentor, but not a teacher:

    The "from" should not be ommitted.

    What you may be hearing (or miss-hearing) is "from" being typically pronounced, by an NES as if it were spelt "frm" (or "frum").

    Hope this helps.
    NT
    Thank you, Neillythere.
    NES = native English speaker?

  4. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Hi enydia
    Yes.
    Regards
    NT

  5. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
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    #5

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    Hi enydia
    Yes.
    Regards
    NT
    Thank you, Neillythere.

    How do you call this kind of speaking method ("from" being pronounced as if it were spelt "frm" or "frum")? Is it common in spoken English?

  6. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Thank you, Neillythere.

    How do you call this kind of speaking method ("from" being pronounced as if it were spelt "frm" or "frum")? Is it common in spoken English?
    <f> is voiceless, and when paired with <r> it can make <r> sound voiceless, giving what may sound like voiceless [fr]. Added to that is syllabic <m>, giving [fr̩m̩]. Then lack of word stress makes <from> sound barely audible. What you hear, or may only hear is voiced [̩m̩] between 'years' and 'now':
    Ex: ... five years [̩m̩] now ...

  7. Neillythere's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Hi enydia

    Anyone speaking in their own native language may appear to be speaking too quickly for a non-native speaker to understand or even hear all the words/letters spoken.

    When words are spoken quickly short vowels can often not be heard, or can be pronounced in a way that doesn't really emphasise the particular short vowel sound concerned.

    In normal Arabic writing, the short vowels are omitted altogether, other than in a religious context. In English, the word "metre" can be spelt "meter" (UK vs US), but is effectively pronounced "metr" which is the way that it is actually spelt in Arabic.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards
    NT

  8. enydia's Avatar

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 414
    #8

    Re: where is the 'from'

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    <f> is voiceless, and when paired with <r> it can make <r> sound voiceless, giving what may sound like voiceless [fr]. Added to that is syllabic <m>, giving [fr̩m̩]. Then lack of word stress makes <from> sound barely audible. What you hear, or may only hear is voiced [̩m̩] between 'years' and 'now':
    Ex: ... five years [̩m̩] now ...
    ... five years [̩m̩] now ...

    yes!


    Quote Originally Posted by Neillythere View Post
    Hi enydia

    Anyone speaking in their own native language may appear to be speaking too quickly for a non-native speaker to understand or even hear all the words/letters spoken.

    When words are spoken quickly short vowels can often not be heard, or can be pronounced in a way that doesn't really emphasise the particular short vowel sound concerned.

    In normal Arabic writing, the short vowels are omitted altogether, other than in a religious context. In English, the word "metre" can be spelt "meter" (UK vs US), but is effectively pronounced "metr" which is the way that it is actually spelt in Arabic.

    Hope this helps.
    Regards
    NT
    Thank you very much, Soup and Neillythere.

    It would be very nice if you could provide me some advice to overcome or to be accustomed to this kind of voice omission.

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