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      • Native Language:
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    #1

    Subject as part of a PP

    This question is mainly for teachers and native speakers of English:
    While googling I came across this piece of information: "A subject is NEVER part of a prepositional phrase".

    Eg1: Neither of these boys wants (not "want") ........
    Eg2: My dog along with her seven puppies has (not "have") chewed all the stuffing out of my sofa cushion.

    I, however, think that I came across other sentences where the whole string (noun + the following pp) was considered as the subject, and therefore a plural verb would be used instead.

    Which is correct? Or is it just a matter of controversy (traditional vs contemporary grammar) ?

    Which way would you opt for? or which is more comon or appropriate?
    Thanks a lot. Thanks indeed.

    (I really wish to get a clear and defenite answer so that I can move on to somethingelse.)

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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      • Native Language:
      • American English
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      • United States
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    #2

    Re: Subject as part of a PP

    First, I am not a teacher, but I am a native speaker.

    I know that people have a hard time with subject/verb agreement and the "X of the Y" formation often has people matching the verb to Y instead of X, but any time I see a rule that says "never" I am doubtful.

    What do you think about "Twelve of the students voted for a pizza party and ten voted for hamburgers."

    I think the subject has to be "twelve of the students" and that "ten" is just an abbreviated version of "ten of the students."

    However, I'm sure a proper teacher will come in to clera the doubts.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
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    #3

    Re: Subject as part of a PP

    "One of the students voted for a pizza party and one voted for hamburgers."

    "Twelve of the students voted for a pizza party and ten voted for hamburgers."

    "The students voted for a pizza party and the staff voted for hamburgers."

    ??

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