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    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #1

    to catch sight

    Hi guys,

    is there a difference between "I caught his sight on the street" and "I caught sight of him on the street"?

    Speaking about situation I spoted the person. You see, in dictionary is the entry "to catch sight (of)" but I dont know if i can use it also in the other form.


    Thank you


    Jirikoo


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #2

    Re: to catch sight

    Not in that way. It would be:

    "I caught sight of him in the street"

    "He caught sight of me in the street"?

    One can say, 'I caught his eye.', meaning, I attracted his attention. This, then, could be meant in two ways.
    The slinky blonde sashayed into the room and caught the eye of every man there, single and married. (Everybody noticed her even though she didn't say a word, and wasn't trying to catch anyone's attention, catch anyone's eye in particular.) Funny that.

    I waved my hand to him across the room until I finally caught his eye. (He did not notice at first, then saw me waving - I caught his eye.)

    Which all brings up the question, when do we use 'in the street' and when do we use 'on the street'?
    Any takers?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Czech
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      • Current Location:
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    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #3

    Re: to catch sight

    Quote Originally Posted by David L. View Post
    Not in that way. It would be:

    "I caught sight of him in the street"

    "He caught sight of me in the street"?

    One can say, 'I caught his eye.', meaning, I attracted his attention. This, then, could be meant in two ways.
    The slinky blonde sashayed into the room and caught the eye of every man there, single and married. (Everybody noticed her even though she didn't say a word, and wasn't trying to catch anyone's attention, catch anyone's eye in particular.) Funny that.

    I waved my hand to him across the room until I finally caught his eye. (He did not notice at first, then saw me waving - I caught his eye.)

    Which all brings up the question, when do we use 'in the street' and when do we use 'on the street'?
    Any takers?
    Dont string me up...in which cases do we say "on the street" and which the other one? :)
    Last edited by jirikoo; 28-Jun-2008 at 09:48.


    • Join Date: Nov 2007
    • Posts: 5,409
    #4

    Re: to catch sight

    Don't string me up...in which cases do we say "on the street" and which the other one? :)


    This reminds me of the graffiti that appeared under the formal notice on boarded-up buildings:
    Bill posters will be prosecuted.

    Stop threatening the man and let him have his day in court!

    Unless this is a new piece of Urban Slang that has not appeared in the Urban Dictionary yet, to 'string someone up' means 'hang someone'.

    Perhaps: 'keep us dangling'.

    I just have the feeling I'm out of date: is 'don't string me up' a new piece of slang with a new meaning, 'keep us waiting/dangling'?





    And if I can pass this one on:
    at the bottom of a toilet door in the men's room of a pub:

    Beware of limbo dancers.

  1. Kraken's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #5

    Re: to catch sight

    Not in that way. It would be:

    "I caught sight of him in the street"
    In the street is BrE; on the street is AmE (I cannot vouch for usage in the other Englishes) when used in such as: She lives in/on Beacon Street. Otherwise, in means on the surface of / in the middle of: Children, don't play in the street!


    When you're talking about addresses in British English, you say on for streets and roads ('he lives on Beacon Street', 'the building's on this road' etc.). Kids can play in the street, but cars can be parked in or on the street. I think people tend to use on when describing things that are permanent or semi-permanent (like leaving a car parked for a while), and in for things that are more temporary.
    Both from Dave's ESL Cafe's Student Discussion Forums :: View topic - 'in the street', 'on the street'

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