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    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 88
    #1

    that

    HI

    There are some verbs in english the word that comes after them for example think and believe.

    I think that I will pass the test.

    I believe that he will pass the test.

    So, could somone PLZ give me those verbs or a link that has all those verbs?

    I searched the net for these words but what I found is the relative clause( they are similiar but it's not what i'm looking for.


    THANKS IN ADVANCE


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
    • Posts: 19,434
    #2

    Re: that

    I agree that you thought he came on time
    I disagree that he came on time
    I hope that he comes
    I know that he will come
    I move that we decide when he is to come
    I see that he has come
    I say that he will come
    I suspect that he will/might come
    I willed that he would come


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 88
    #3

    Re: that

    thanks angilka

    what are these verbs called?

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    #4

    Re: that

    Quote Originally Posted by fantastic View Post
    thanks angilka

    what are these verbs called?
    They are verbs that take complement clauses.
    "In many languages, certain verbs—notably 'see', 'hear', 'know', 'believe', 'like', and often also 'tell' and 'want'—can take a clause, instead of an NP (noun phrase), as a core argument. This is called a complement clause." (Dixon 2006:1)

    https://lingweb.eva.mpg.de/linguiped...plement_clause
    Note that,
    Relative cluases are not complement clauses. Relative clauses modify a noun phrase, whereas complement clauses are arguments which are selected by a verb [VP complement clause], noun, or adjective. In some languages, relative clauses have a gap--a missing NP argument--which is understood to refer to the NP that the relative clause modifies. For instance, in "the person that saw you," the subject of the clause "saw you" is missing, but is understood to be "the person" that the NP as a whole refers to. Complement clauses do not usually have such a gap. For instance, in "the fact that he saw you," the clause "he saw you" does not have any missing arguments.

    What is a complement clause?


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 88
    #5

    Re: that

    Sometimes they are deleted?

    I think he is going to win

    especially in spoken english. Am i correct?


    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 41
    #6

    Re: that

    Why to use "that" in those sentences?. They sound much better without it.
    • I think I will pass the test.
    • I believe he will pass the test.
    (I'm not an English teacher)


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 88
    #7

    Re: that

    yes they look better but the question is

    Can we delete them in spoken and writen english?


    • Join Date: Mar 2008
    • Posts: 88
    #8

    Re: that

    Is it correct if i delete THAT in writing and while speaking in Academic English

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