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  1. enydia's Avatar

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    #1

    the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Hi, Teachers.

    What's the preposition after the adj 'indulgent'?

    I've consulted some dictionaries, but haven't gotten a satisfactory answer.

    I found many different examples from internet:
    be indulgent to sb
    We shouldn't be indulgent towards his mistakes.
    indulgent of your own appetites and desires
    You are too indulgent with your children.
    ...

    Are these all correct?
    How to choose among them?

    Thank you in advance.

    Enydia

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    They are all sound reasonable to me.
    Maybe the first sentence could be "towards" as well.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hi, Teachers.

    What's the preposition after the adj 'indulgent'?

    I've consulted some dictionaries, but haven't gotten a satisfactory answer.

    I found many different examples from internet:
    be indulgent to sb
    We shouldn't be indulgent towards his mistakes.
    indulgent of your own appetites and desires
    You are too indulgent with your children.
    ...

    Are these all correct?
    How to choose among them?

    Thank you in advance.

    Enydia
    I don't think that "indulgent of" works.

  4. enydia's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    They are all sound reasonable to me.
    Maybe the first sentence could be "towards" as well.
    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    I don't think that "indulgent of" works.
    Hello, Teachers.

    Thank you for your replies.

    I just find some further information (from The Columbia Guide to Standard American English):
    indulgent (adj.)
    can combine with several prepositions: in, as in He is too indulgent in disciplinary matters; of, as in They are too indulgent of her crotchets; to, as in He seems indulgent to [toward] all their foibles; and with, as in We try not to be too indulgent with the children.
    But now I'm still confused.
    What's the difference between indulgent of, indulgent to/toward and indulgent with? How to choose between them while writing?
    It would be very nice if you could give me some detailed advice.

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards.

    Enydia

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Indulgent (IN dul jent) adj: allowing, conceding (Difficult Words: Indulgent, Indignant, Ineffable, Inept, Inexorable and Inert)
    The nice mom was indulgent of her children, letting them have all the candy,cookies, and ice cream that they wanted, even for breakfast.


    The indulgent censure of posterity. -- Waller.
    The feeble old, indulgent of their ease. -- Dryden. http://www.subdomaindictionary.com/?q=indulgent
    self-indulgent - indulgent of your own appetites and desires;
    self-indulgent - definition, thesaurus and related words from WordNet-Online

    and "indulgent of" is found in 41,400 other Googled instances – although this itself is not proof of its correctness.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Indulgent (IN dul jent) adj: allowing, conceding (Difficult Words: Indulgent, Indignant, Ineffable, Inept, Inexorable and Inert)
    The nice mom was indulgent of her children, letting them have all the candy,cookies, and ice cream that they wanted, even for breakfast.


    The indulgent censure of posterity. -- Waller.
    The feeble old, indulgent of their ease. -- Dryden. http://www.subdomaindictionary.com/?q=indulgent
    self-indulgent - indulgent of your own appetites and desires;
    self-indulgent - definition, thesaurus and related words from WordNet-Online

    and "indulgent of" is found in 41,400 other Googled instances – although this itself is not proof of its correctness.
    Yes, you are right, somehow "indulgent of" didn't seem right to me, sorry.

  7. enydia's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hello, Teachers.

    Thank you for your replies.

    I just find some further information (from The Columbia Guide to Standard American English):
    indulgent (adj.)
    can combine with several prepositions: in, as in He is too indulgent in disciplinary matters; of, as in They are too indulgent of her crotchets; to, as in He seems indulgent to [toward] all their foibles; and with, as in We try not to be too indulgent with the children.
    But now I'm still confused.
    What's the difference between indulgent of, indulgent to/toward and indulgent with? How to choose between them while writing?
    It would be very nice if you could give me some detailed advice.

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards.

    Enydia
    Dear Teachers:

    The following is from Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage:
    indulgent
    When indulgent is used with a preposition, it may be in, of, to or with:
    It is true, again, that "wealth" has become far more indulgent in its treatment of intellectuals —Irving Howe, Partisan Rev., January-February 1954
    ... is so indulgent in its enumerations of irrelevant detail —N.Y. Times Book Rev., 24 Dec. 1978
    ... more appreciative of his success, more indulgent of his short-comings —Nathaniel Hawthorne, The Marble Faun, 1860
    Is his library board indulgent of his absences? — Nancy R. McAdams, Library Jour., 1 Dec. 1966
    ... would perhaps be more indulgent to my vivacity —Matthew Arnold, Preface to Essays in Criticism, First Series, 1865
    ... are indulgent to the cruelties of Russia —Ray-mond Aron, Encounter, January 1955
    He is, therefore, often cynical or gently indulgent with the wonder and admiration of the common man for scientific predictions —Stephen C. Pepper, World Hypotheses, 1942
    The fans could afford to be indulgent with the antics of Moose —Boy's Life, February 1953
    Now, according to all the sentences I quoted, I don't think there are some notable differences between indulgent of, indulgent to/toward and indulgent with. Am I right?

    Looking forward to your reply.

    Regards.

    Enydia

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    #8

    Re: the preposition after 'indulgent'

    Not a teacher, but here's my rule of thumb:

    Indulgent towards someone (a person) meaning adopt an indulgent attitude.

    Indulgent of something that a person does

    Examples

    I am indulgent towards my daughter who is untidy

    I am indulgent of my daughter's untidiness

    But if you use the verb indulge, you need no preposition:

    I indulge my daughter (meaning I pamper her)

    I indulge her untidiness (meaning I tolerate - or even encourage - her untidiness)

    Hope that helps.

    Dave

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