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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Russian
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      • Russian Federation
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      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
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    #1

    put yourself on the line

    Hello everyone

    I'd like to ask the phrase "put yourself on the line" in the following context:

    You may be feeling unusually romantic, but there's no harm in letting yourself be young and frivolous once in a while, especially when it comes to love. If you are tense or hesitant about showing your feelings, you could miss out on the wonders of love. Sometimes, you need to put yourself on the line if you want to get somewhere in the romance and relationships stakes.

    Does the phrase "put yourself on the line" mean "to risk"?



    • Member Info
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      • Tamil
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      • India
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      • India

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 619
    #2

    Re: put yourself on the line

    Put yourself on the line:Put yourself in a situation where you have

    absolutely no choice but to achieve it.

    Regards,
    rj1948.

  1. stuartnz's Avatar
    • Member Info
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      • English
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      • New Zealand
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      • New Zealand

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
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    #3

    Re: put yourself on the line

    Quote Originally Posted by rj1948 View Post
    Put yourself on the line:Put yourself in a situation where you have

    absolutely no choice but to achieve it.

    Regards,
    rj1948.
    That's an interesting definition of the phrase, and not one that is common here in NZ. I am not a teacher, but here "to put yourself on the line" would be understood to mean, "give it your very best attempt", "exert all your effort", "put everything you have into the attempt", but always with the element of risk, the possibility of failure. That's why the definition that "you have absolutely no choice but to achieve it" would be very unusual here. The phrase is understood here to mean trying as hard as you can, not holding anything back, risking everything for the chance of success, without any certainty of achieving your goal. I would suggest that in matters of love and romance this definition, with its implicit acknowledgement of the risk of failure, might be more appropriate.

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