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    #1

    remaking of six sentences 8

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough verify the remaking of the following six sentences, using different collocations with the verb “run” instead of the italicized words and phrases?

    1.1. He always seeks the society of his elders.
    1.2. He always runs after his elders.

    2.1. Our conversation dealt with our immediate needs.
    2.2. Our conversation ran on our immediate needs.

    3.1. We must rehearse our parts, to be on the safe side.
    3.2. We must run over our parts, to be on the safe side.

    4.1. Let’s hoist the camp flag, first of all.
    4.2. Let’s run up the camp flag, first of all.

    5.1. She talked so rapidly and incessantly that nobody could utter a word.
    5.2. She ran on so that nobody could utter a word.

    6.1. The water is leaking out of the old tank.
    6.2. The water is running out of the old tank.

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 04-Jul-2008 at 09:11.


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    #2

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough verify the remaking of the following six sentences, using different collocations with the verb “run” instead of the italicized words and phrases?

    1.1. He always seeks the society of his elders.
    1.2. He always runs after his elders.
    Not quite the same - "run after" generally has the meaning of trying to get the attention of someone.

    2.1. Our conversation dealt with our immediate needs.
    2.2. Our conversation ran on our immediate needs.
    Not quite the same. "Dealt with" = concerned - implies that something was discussed and concluded; "Ran on" = continually was about - it implies a discussion that is continuous

    3.1. We must rehearse our parts, to be on the safe side.
    3.2. We must run over our parts, to be on the safe side.

    4.1. Let’s hoist the camp flag, first of all.
    4.2. Let’s run up the camp flag, first of all.

    5.1. She talked so rapidly and incessantly that nobody could utter a word.
    5.2. She ran on so much that nobody could utter a word.
    "...nobody could get a word in"


    6.1. The water is leaking out of the old tank.
    6.2. The water is running out of the old tank.
    Leaking implies the water is slowly escaping from the tank; running out implies the water is gushing out of the tank

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards.

    V.
    .

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    #3

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Dear Anglika,

    Thank you for your deep analysis of my wording in my original post.

    I agree with your statement concerning the sentence 1.2.

    Actually “run after” was a malapropism in the present case because“run after”, also “chase after” = “pursue someone sexually or romantically” which is a far cry from “seeks the society of”.

    Regarding the sentence 2.2. I take different view with you. The first meaning of “run on” is “talk or narrate at length” which in my native language means “discuss”. It is most likely that I am incapable of understanding the lights and shades of many English expressions.

    There are a few reasons for all my proper reserves.

    run on = 1. talk or narrate at length
    2. continue uninterrupted
    Happy to talk - at length - about his causes.

    Others narrate at length some episode relating to the god. (discuss)

    Thank you also for your correction of my wording in sentence 5.2.

    I was begiled with the following models to imitate:

    not open one’s mouth (idiom)
    Also, shut one's mouth; not say or utter a word. Be silent, repress one's feelings or opinions, keep a secret. For example, Don't worry, I'm not going to open my mouth on this issue, or She promised not to say a word about it to anyone.

    Say a Word: Information and Much More from Answers.com

    No doubt, your “get a word in” would be more appropriate for the present case.

    There is a point of difference concerning the expressions “leaking out” and “running out” in sentence 6.1. and 6.2. If I hear the word “leak” I have a hazy recollection of a vulgar slang namely “take a leak“. Because run out = flow out (flow or spill fort, effuse, emanate as in “Water emanates from this hole in the ground” ) = flow off (flow off or away gradually; "The water flowed off from the pipe", flow away) I think that in the present case it is important the final result “flowing”, “outflow” respectively the verbs “run out”, “flow out” and “flow off” and not the continuation of the very flowing. This is my point of view.

    I know the meaning of “my shoes leak” but there are also “flow”, “run”, “begin to flow/run”, “begin to leak”. I know also the meaning of “drip out” as well as “bleed to death”.

    Regards.

    V


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    #4

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    #1 I appreciate what you are trying to say about "run on" in terms someone speaking, but it has the meaning of someone speaking without allowing others to contribute. Therefore it is not the correct term if what you are meaning is that the content of a discussion was how to deal with our immediate needs.


    #2 Despite the colloquial "take a leak", the concept of a leak is something that is flowing slowly, or even only seeping from a crack in a pipe.

    Water that is running is moving in quantity and at speed. In your sentence, it could be flowing over the top of the tank, not seeping from a crack in the corner, which would be a leak.

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    #5

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Hi Anglika,

    Thank you for your very convincing explanations. Thank you also for your selfless efforts to help me.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #6

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers, (i'm not)

    6.1. The water is leaking out of the old tank.
    6.2. The water is running out of the old tank.

    V.
    For me, this could be a wrong use of the phrasal verb running out I think.

    For such the situation there is another word pouring.

    The water is pouring out of the old tank.

    And the words leaking and pouring are very different in meaning. (as it 's been explained about)

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    #7

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Hi e2e4,

    Thank you for your comradely recommendation. It goes without saying that I know about the existence of the verb pour. For example: “Blood was pouring from his nose” and “She poured out all her troubles to him”. But I have to carry out a tricky piece of work. I make it my aim to remake the original sentence using collocations with the verb “run”
    so I as a diligent apprentice sought the aid of my old Dictionary. My unsuccessful choice was “run out”. I accepted the following meaning of the expression in question namely “run out” = “to become void”.

    You may add to your knowledge the following random excerpts from my Dictionary which has to do with the matter in question in order to understand my phrasing in the present case and find the the scarcely perceptible connection between "leaking" and "running out".

    draw out, drain, run off, draw out

    flaw, run out, escape

    she has cried her eyes out
    Drip out
    bleed to death
    run off into
    drain
    flaw off, flaw away

    leak (v) = spill (v) = to cause or allow (a substance) to run or fall out of a container.
    leak (v) = discharge
    discharge pipe = any pipe that conveys the discharge from plumbing fixtures, appliances, or the like.

    leak (v) = dripp (v) as in, his hand dripped with blood.

    leak (v) = escape (v)

    leak (v) = percolate = to drain or seep through a porous material or filter or “to pass or ooze through”as in: Water percolated the sand.

    Blood was still oozing from the wound.

    You have running nose with blood in cold time.

    Thank you again for your Puritan exactness.

    Regards.

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 06-Jul-2008 at 07:14.

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    #8

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi e2e4,

    Thank you for your comradely recommendation. You're welcome.
    It goes without saying that I know about the existence of the verb pour. For sure you knew. It was such as a wrong move in a chess game.
    For example: “Blood was pouring from his nose” (flaw again, leaking would be better word here) and “She poured out all her troubles to him”.(very good example)
    But I have to carry out a tricky piece of work. (of course) I make it my aim to remake the original sentence using collocations with the verb “run”
    so I as a diligent apprentice sought the aid of my old Dictionary. My unsuccessful choice was “run out”. I accepted the following meaning of the expression in question namely “run out” = “to become void”.

    You may add to your knowledge the following random excerpts from my Dictionary which has to do with the matter ((in question) (in order)) so as to be able (slightly better, forgive me if i'm wrong, but if I am not you may push the thank button down this topic) to understand my phrasing in the present case and find (the) the scarcely perceptible connection between "leaking" and "running out".

    draw out, drain, run off, draw out

    flaw, run out, escape

    she has cried her eyes out
    Drip out
    bleed to death
    run off into
    drain
    flaw off, flaw away

    leak (v) = spill (v) = to cause or allow (a substance) to run or fall out of a container.
    leak (v) = discharge
    discharge pipe = any pipe that conveys the discharge from plumbing fixtures, appliances, or the like.

    leak (v) = dripp (v) as in, his hand dripped with blood.

    leak (v) = escape (v)

    leak (v) = percolate = to drain or seep through a porous material or filter or “to pass or ooze through”as in: Water percolated the sand.

    Blood was still oozing from the wound.

    You have running nose with blood in cold time.

    Thank you again for your Puritan exactness.

    Regards.

    V.
    I understand you completely for it wasn't easy find out the proper word which could substitute the word leaking (from a tank, cask or similar) at that very moment.

    Even though they say the language consists 500 000 different words I still don't know the right one which substitute leaking.


    Last edited by e2e4; 06-Jul-2008 at 11:44.

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    #9

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Hi e2e4,

    Thank you for your very intelligently written post.

    Regards.

    V.

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    #10

    Re: remaking of six sentences 8

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Hi e2e4,

    Thank you for your very intelligently written post.

    Regards. (wrong use of the full stop)

    V.

    The button!

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