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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    Fast-forward XX years and...

    Hi,

    Which Keyboard? | (parent . thesis) - Parenting and technology with Amy and Michael Tiemann - CNET News.com
    Fast forward twenty years and I was working 12-16 hours a day hacking on the GNU C++ compiler with...

    Vladivostok's forgotten children - GrownUps New Zealand
    Fast-forward almost ten years and I am helping Rachael Hughes cart garden pots up to her Onehunga apartment.

    Is this usage of "fast-forward" correct and common?

  1. Soup's Avatar
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    English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Yes.


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    #3

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Even though the usage is correct and common, no dictionary explains about it.


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    #4

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...



    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #5

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    1) Fast-forward almost ten years and I am helping Rachael Hughes cart garden pots up to her Onehunga apartment.
    2) Watch it closely and you'll see.
    3) Disagree with me again and you're fired!

    Is sentence 1's structure the same as the rest's?


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #6

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    1) Fast-forward almost ten years and I am helping Rachael Hughes cart garden pots up to her Onehunga apartment.
    2) Watch it closely and you'll see.
    3) Disagree with me again and you're fired!

    Is sentence 1's structure the same as the rest's?
    Yes, it is: statement and consequence of statement.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Even though the usage is correct and common, no dictionary explains about it.
    Slang and colloquial phrases often change much faster than dictionary editions. Also, many mainstream dictionaries, as opposed to slang dictionaries, would wait to see if a term catches on before entering it.


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    #8

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    There are two expressions which might be related to "Fast-forward + [ time ] + and + subject + verb".

    "Fast-forward to + [ time ] + later and + subject + verb"
    YogaPulse
    Fast forward to 6 years later and I'm an eager participant when an "om" occasion arises.

    "Fast-forward + [ time ] + later and + subject + verb"
    Microsoft Surface: the Fine Clothes of a Naked Empire
    Fast forward six months later, and the iPhone is still bathed in giddy anticipation, with more than a million users officially signed up, clamoring for information on its release.

    Do these three mean the same? Are they grammatical?

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    #9

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    There are two expressions which might be related to "Fast-forward + [ time ] + and + subject + verb".

    "Fast-forward to + [ time ] + later and + subject + verb"
    YogaPulse
    Fast forward to 6 years later and I'm an eager participant when an "om" occasion arises.

    "Fast-forward + [ time ] + later and + subject + verb"
    Microsoft Surface: the Fine Clothes of a Naked Empire
    Fast forward six months later, and the iPhone is still bathed in giddy anticipation, with more than a million users officially signed up, clamoring for information on its release.

    Do these three mean the same? Are they grammatical?
    I can only see two, but yes, they're ok, but I personally wouldn't say
    "Fast forward six months later,". I'd say "Fast forward to six months later" or "Fast forward six months."
    You do realise, I suppose, that the term comes from the "FF - Fast Forward" button on a video player?


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #10

    Re: Fast-forward XX years and...

    Thank you very much, Raymott.
    Yes, I realize that it does.

    Which is correct, "fast-forward"(one word) or "fast forward"(two words)?

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