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    #1

    also

    Consider these two cases:
    1-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I also might eat a hamburger.
    2-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I might also eat a hamburger.

    Does one of the above mean:
    A-"I might eat a hamburger in addition to the other two." (I think in this case one would normally say: 'I might eat a hamburger also.')
    while the other one means
    B-"I might a hamburger and not the other two"?

  1. proof.beh's Avatar

    • Join Date: Mar 2008
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    #2

    Re: also

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Consider these two cases:
    1-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I also might eat a hamburger.
    2-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I might also eat a hamburger.

    Does one of the above mean:
    A-"I might eat a hamburger in addition to the other two." (I think in this case one would normally say: 'I might eat a hamburger also.')
    while the other one means
    B-"I might a hamburger and not the other two"?
    They both mean the same:

    It's possible to eat a hamburger, but I surely eat a ham sandwich or some pasta when I come form work!

    Not A Teacher

    Cheers,
    P

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: also

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Consider these two cases:
    1-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I also might eat a hamburger.
    2-When I come home from work, I eat a ham sandwich or some pasta. I might also eat a hamburger.
    They mean the same thing but 2. is more common.
    When they mean the same thing, the general pattern is:
    <Subject> <modal> <adverb> <verb>.
    I would also like a drink. Better than: I also would like a drink.

    However, in some cases it's more complicated than that, and placement of the adverb can change the meaning to the opposite!
    He just wouldn't shut up. (He didn't shut up)
    He wouldn't just shut up; he'd became moody as well. (He did shut up)

  3. RonBee's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: also

    Both sentences mean you might eat a hamburger in addition to either pasta or a ham sandwich.


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