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    #1

    out of

    It cannot be checked out of the libarary.



    i don't understand why "out of" is used in this sentence.
    Can i just say that it cannot be checked out the libarary?

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    #2

    Re: out of

    I'm not a teacher.

    Hi Flyby,

    You have to pay attention to the phrasal verb “check out”.

    check out (v) = to withdraw (an item) after recording the withdrawal: check out books of a library

    The materials cost the library money. Too many people dont want to buy their own books so they will often times not return the books to the library. The only way to maintain the materials and information on who borrows them is to have the items checked out with return dates.

    Library materials are checked in and out for a number of reasons. First and foremost so that the library knows who has the item(s) at any time. Secondly, checking an item in and out enables a library to know which items are going out and how often they are.

    Regards

    V.

  1. RonBee's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: out of

    That little word "of" is important. We take the books out of the library after we check the books out of the library. (Then we take the books home from the library.) The phrasal verb "check out" is in this case a separable phrasal verb.

    Last edited by RonBee; 07-Jul-2008 at 17:05. Reason: spelling

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    #4

    Re: out of

    then in that sentence does "of" means "from"?

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    #5

    Re: out of

    There is a quatation of my post above:

    check out (v) = to withdraw (an item) after recording the withdrawal: check out books of a library

    Regards

    V.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: out of

    Ex: It cannot be checked out.
    Ex: It cannot be checked out of [place]

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: out of

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    There is a quatation of my post above:

    check out (v) = to withdraw (an item) after recording the withdrawal: check out books of a library

    Regards

    V.
    In the US, you'd say you checked out the books fromthe library.

    Books can be checked out of the library, or checked out from the library, but only "from" when used in this word order: check out the books from the library.

    Perhap it's different elsewhere.


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    #8

    Re: out of

    I agree completely with the above poster. In British English, it's the same.


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    #9

    Re: out of

    Surely it is the same usage as "I checked out of the hotel"?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: out of

    But the transitive use of check out: I checked out these books FROM the library.

    Compared to the intransitive or passive:
    The books were checked out of/from (either one) the library.
    I checked out of the hotel.

    *I checked out these books of the library.

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