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  1. enydia's Avatar

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    #1

    appealing through the courts

    Hello, Teachers.

    I see the following sentence in a dictionary:
    The council must now decide whether to go to the expense of appealing through the courts.

    What's the meaning of 'appealing through the courts'?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia *^_^*

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hello, Teachers.

    I see the following sentence in a dictionary:
    The council must now decide whether to go to the expense of appealing through the courts.

    What's the meaning of 'appealing through the courts'?

    Thanks in advance.

    Enydia *^_^*
    In the case of a judgement against an individual or an organisation, there can be an appeal against the judgement made through the courts of law. This is a process which can be expensive.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: appealing through the courts

    "I saw the following sentence in a dictionary:"

  4. enydia's Avatar

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    #4

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    In the case of a judgement against an individual or an organisation, there can be an appeal against the judgement made through the courts of law. This is a process which can be expensive.
    Hi, Bhaisahab.

    Thank you for your replies.

    I'd like to ask two further questions:

    (1) I've only seen 'appeal to the court', never 'appeal through the court'. Do these two phrases have the similar meanings?

    (2) Why did the writer use 'courts' (plural), not court (sing)?

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards.

    Enydia *^_^*

  5. Ouisch's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: appealing through the courts

    In the US, the appeal process can be lengthy and may go through many levels - county court, state court, federal court, Supreme court. So quite often we use "court" in the plural sense.

    If a person has been found guilty in a criminal case, he has the right to appeal the decision. If his appeal is denied by the lowest level, the person has the right to appeal to a higher court to re-examine the decision.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hi, Bhaisahab.

    Thank you for your replies.

    I'd like to ask two further questions:

    (1) I've only seen 'appeal to the court', never 'appeal through the court'. Do these two phrases have the similar meanings?

    (2) Why did the writer use 'courts' (plural), not court (sing)?

    Thanks in advance.

    Regards.

    Enydia *^_^*
    We appeal to the court or through the courts. As Ouisch has explained there are several levels of court to which we can appeal. In the UK there are similar, if not the same, stages.


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    #7

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "I saw the following sentence in a dictionary:"
    You're a native BrE speaker, are you not, Bhaisahab? Might I ask, why not,

    "I've seen the following sentence in a dictionary" ?

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by riverkid View Post
    You're a native BrE speaker, are you not, Bhaisahab? Might I ask, why not,

    "I've seen the following sentence in a dictionary" ?
    Both "I saw..." and "I've seen..." are correct, the first is simple past and the second is present perfect. I suggested "I saw..." because the original question was phrased "I seen..." and I thought it was more in keeping, same number of words, but you are right, it could have been either.

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    #9

    Re: appealing through the courts

    I see the following sentence in a dictionary:
    I think the present tense can also be used if you mean to say that ' I still see the sentence'.

    'Appeal through the court(s)' is preferred since it is a tedious and long drawn process.

    not a teacher

  9. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #10

    Re: appealing through the courts

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    We appeal to the court or through the courts. As Ouisch has explained there are several levels of court to which we can appeal. In the UK there are similar, if not the same, stages.
    I believe that the right to appeal to a higher court is not always permitted; leave to appeal can be withheld if the case has no merit.

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