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    #1

    Smile gerund

    I went to bed. I had already brushed my teeth. (after)
    I went to bed after having brushed my teeth.
    I went to bed after brushing my teeth.
    Which one is correct? I want to use a gerund.
    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: gerund

    I went to bed after having brushed my teeth.
    I went to bed after brushing my teeth.

    Note, in America English "had" is often omitted:
    Ex: I went to bed after I (had) brushed my teeth.
    Ex: I went to bed after having brushed my teeth.
    Ex: I went to bed after brushing my teeth.

    Ex: After having brushed my teeth, I went to bed.
    Ex: After brushing my teeth, I went to bed.

    Ex: Having brushed my teeth, I went to bed.
    Ex: Brushing my teeth, I went to bed.
    ____________________
    See Reducing Adverbial Clauses

    Different times


    • After I finished my homework, I went to bed.
      After finishing my homework, I went to bed.

      After I had finished my homework, I went to bed.
      After having finished my homework, I went to bed.
      Having finished my homework, I went to bed.
      Before he left the dance, Jerry said good-bye.Before leaving the dance, Jerry said good-bye.

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    #3

    Re: gerund

    a learner


    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    I went to bed after having brushed my teeth.
    I went to bed after brushing my teeth.

    Note, in America English "had" is often omitted:
    Ex: I went to bed after I (had) brushed my teeth.
    Ex: I went to bed after having brushed my teeth.
    Ex: I went to bed after brushing my teeth.

    Ex: After having brushed my teeth, I went to bed.
    Ex: After brushing my teeth, I went to bed.

    Ex: Having brushed my teeth, I went to bed.
    Ex: Brushing my teeth, I went to bed.
    ____________________
    See Reducing Adverbial Clauses

    Different times


    • After I finished my homework, I went to bed.
      After finishing my homework, I went to bed.

      After I had finished my homework, I went to bed.
      After having finished my homework, I went to bed.
      Having finished my homework, I went to bed.
      Before he left the dance, Jerry said good-bye.
    • Before leaving the dance, Jerry said good-bye.
    I prefer these
    Last edited by e2e4; 13-Jul-2008 at 13:11. Reason: prefer and not preffer

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    #4

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    I preffer these
    Why?

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    #5

    Re: gerund

    a learner


    Having finished my work I went to bed.


    The complex (perfect, in particular) gerund used in the sentence is what the topic starter wanted to see, I think.

    Word order in the sentence is following the performed actions.
    The sentence is both a simple and a short one what all the rest are not.

    After having finished my work I went to bed
    would be even incorrect one for there is no need to say twice that someone went to bed before did something else.

    Having finished is good enough to say that. The perfect gerund, in particular, exist because of such possibility.
    In other words the preposition after is already hidden in the perfect gerund.
    So there is no need for having two of it in the setnence

    In addition

    Before he left the dance Jerry said good buy wouldn't be the best one at all.
    But also

    Before leaving the dance Jerry said good buy. isn't quite right too.

    Leaving the dance Jerry said good buy.
    It means that while Jerry was leaving the dance he said good buy. (and not before the event)

    He said good bye exactly on time.

    also
    Leaving the party, he greeted us all. (We were seeing him off)
    Last edited by e2e4; 15-Jul-2008 at 20:23. Reason: to note that I am a learner, perfect gerund and not passive gerund which I haven't used this time

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    #6

    Re: gerund

    Having finished my work I went to bed.
    After having finished my work I went to bed


    Before he left the dance, Jerry said goodbye
    Before leaving the dance Jerry said goodbye.
    Leaving the dance Jerry said goodbye.


    I'm not a professional teacher, but of the first two, "after having finished" sounds much more natural and less formal. It is not redundant, either, since it carries the sense of "immediately after". The redundancy you claim is in fact an added detail.

    Of the other three, the last one sounds very unnatural to me. It would mean that he was in the process of leaving and simultaneously said goodbye. Not impossible at all, but a construction that does not sound natural. If that was the intended meaning, the phrasing would more likely be something like "as he was leaving the dance, Jerry...", not simply "leaving the dance...".

    The one that would like be heard most often is the first one, "before he left the dance, ...". There is nothing grammatically wrong with it, and it sounds most natural. The second would not be heard as often, but still sounds more natural than the third option. The one that would likely NEVER be heard is:
    "Leaving the party, he greeted us all." In English we do not use "greet" for the exchange of salutations on departure. "Entering the party, he greeted us all" or "leaving the party, he said his farewells", but definitely not "Leaving the party, he greeted us all."
    Last edited by stuartnz; 13-Jul-2008 at 13:43. Reason: fix typos

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    #7

    Re: gerund

    a learner form bosnia

    Quote Originally Posted by stuartnz View Post
    Having finished my work I went to bed.
    After having finished my work I went to bed


    Before he left the dance, Jerry said goodbye
    Before leaving the dance Jerry said goodbye.
    (While he was) Leaving the dance Jerry said goodbye.


    I'm not a professional teacher, but of the first two, "after having finished" sounds much more natural and less formal. It is not redundant, either, since it carries the sense of "immediately after".
    Having done my work I immediately went to bed.
    Connection to The redundancy you claim is in fact an added detail.

    Of the other three, the last one sounds very unnatural to me. It would mean that he was in the process of leaving and simultaneously said goodbye. Not impossible at all, but a construction that does not sound natural. If that was the intended meaning, the phrasing would more likely be something like "as he was leaving the dance, Jerry...", not simply "leaving the dance...".
    I thought that saying good bye is a part of leaving
    The one that would like be heard most often is the first one, "before he left the dance, ...". There is nothing grammatically wrong with it, and it sounds most natural. The second would not be heard as often, but still sounds more natural than the third option. The one that would likely NEVER be heard is:
    "Leaving the party, he greeted us all." In English we do not use "greet" for the exchange of salutations on departure. "Entering the party, he greeted us all" or "leaving the party, he said his farewells", but definitely not "Leaving the party, he greeted us all." Because of this I pressed the button


    In addition

    I immediately went to bed, having done my work. Is having done my work an adverb here?

    Having done my work I immediately went to bed. Could this be an inversion?
    Last edited by e2e4; 13-Jul-2008 at 19:04.

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    #8

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by e2e4 View Post
    I immediately went to bed, having done my work.

    Is having done my work an adverb here?

    Having done my work, I immediately went to bed.

    Could this be an inversion?
    Adverbs, as you know, modify verbs. What element in the sentence below does having done my work modify?
    Ex: I (having done my work) immediately went to bed.
    To answer your second question, having done my work is short for after having done my work, which is, in turn, short for after I had done my work.
    Ex: After I had done my work, I went to bed. <topicalization, not inversion>
    Ex: I went to bed after I had done my work.
    After I had done my work is an adverbial clause. Move it to the front of the sentence and the meaning it houses becomes more prominent;i.e., topicalization, that is, it is placed in primary focus--it's the first thing the reader sees, the listener hears.

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    #9

    Re: gerund

    Quote Originally Posted by Soup View Post
    Adverbs, as you know, modify verbs. What element in the sentence below does having done my work modify?
    Ex: I (having done my work) immediately went to bed.
    Ex: I immediately went to bed having done my work.
    Ex: I immediately went to bed not having done my work.
    Having done my work and not having done my work isn't the same way of going to bed, I think.
    When mentioned adverbs I actually thought about my invention, phrasal adverbs, I haven't seen in any grammar till now.
    But some time after I had seen your comments I recalled that I had read once that these sentences are so called reduced adverbial clauses. (he, he, then I gave once over the matter in my a poor number of books, and got the confirmation about, afterwards, I think. )
    In such reduced adverbials the perfect gerund is chiefly used to emphasis the deep past.

    And if professors call them reduced adverbials, I've just thought, these adverbials might have some influences to the verbs in the main sentences which they're tied to.

    In addition, both (AmE and BrE) the grammars say that After I had done my job (I immediately went to bed) is an adverbial clause as you've mentioned.

    Butthe sentence Having done my job, (I immediately went to bed) some of the members, as to my information, do not recognise like the correct one. They ought to be brought round and recognise them correct as soon as possible.
    And in the clauses, to emphasis again, usually there is no need for one more after! As I already said one is quite enough. It is hidden in the reduced adverbials.
    Who knows, at last, maybe my post is going to
    have been thanked by at least one of them (not you of course) before the time at which you will be finishing the reading, even .
    To answer your second question, having done my work is short for after having done my work, which is, in turn, short for after I had done my work. I see your word short = reduced, this time only
    Ex: After I had done my work, I went to bed. <topicalization, not inversion>
    Ex: I went to bed after I had done my work.
    After I had done my work is an adverbial clause. Move it to the front of the sentence and the meaning it houses becomes more prominent;i.e., topicalization, that is, it is placed in primary focus--it's the first thing the reader sees, the listener hears. Oh, actually I thought about word order in the sentence, so called fronting in BrE. Anyway so as to defend myself up I wanna point that I said, 'Could this be an inversion', and not, 'Is this the inversion in English?'
    In order to improve my English I think I ought to talk (write) as much as possible. Owing to my mind isn't only a full bob of the most beautiful English words but not full bob of any type and at all, I am not in such position to write a novel but to write on such forums only. So as to keep myself doing that, I talk about things which I reckon interesting so, for I read every of my posts before I have submitted the writing. (and some of them many times)
    learner from bosnia


    Last edited by e2e4; 15-Jul-2008 at 20:55.

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