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  1. enydia's Avatar

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    #1

    usage of 'aspiring'

    Hello, Teachers.

    Two dictionaries, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (6th edition), say that 'aspiring' can be 'only before noun'.

    But I'm wondering whether those sentences like the following ones is grammatical:
    (1) This is a must read for those aspiring to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I was aspiring to reach, but it's certainly an honor.

    Thank you in advance.

    Best regards.

    Enydia *^_^*

    ps: Is my expression, 'those sentences like the following ones', grammatical and common? If not, how to express the meaning properly?

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    #2

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Hello,
    Notice I'm not a teacher.
    But I'm wondering whether those sentences like the following ones is grammatical:
    I think you repeated yourself, I would say:

    But I've been wondering [if/whether] those sentences are grammarical.
    Or
    But I've been wondering [if/whether] the following sentences are grammatical.


    (1) This is a must read for those aspiring to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I was aspiring to reach, but it's certainly an honor.
    aspiring is an adjective.
    For that meaning use phrasal verb aspire to sth

    (1) This is a must read for those who aspire to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I aspired to (reach - I would leave it our), but it's certainly an honor.

    Cheers

  2. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello,
    Notice I'm not a teacher.


    I think you repeated yourself, I would say:

    But I've been wondering [if/whether] those sentences are grammarical.
    Or
    But I've been wondering [if/whether] the following sentences are grammatical.



    aspiring is an adjective.
    For that meaning use phrasal verb aspire to sth

    (1) This is a must read for those who aspire to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I aspired to (reach - I would leave it our), but it's certainly an honor.

    Cheers
    aspire to noun
    1. This is a must read for those who aspire to CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    2. It's not something that I aspired to, but it's certainly an honor.

  3. whitemoon's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hello, Teachers.

    Two dictionaries, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (6th edition), say that 'aspiring' can be 'only before noun'.

    But I'm wondering whether those sentences like the following ones is grammatical:
    (1) This is a must read for those aspiring to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I was aspiring to reach, but it's certainly an honor.

    Thank you in advance.

    Best regards.

    Enydia *^_^*

    ps: Is my expression, 'those sentences like the following ones', grammatical and common? If not, how to express the meaning properly?

    (1) This is a must read for those (who are) aspiring to CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I was aspiring to, but it's certainly an honor.
    Hope that help you!

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    Hello, Teachers.

    Two dictionaries, Longman Dictionary of Contemporary English and Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary (6th edition), say that 'aspiring' can be 'only before noun'.

    But I'm wondering whether those sentences like the following ones is grammatical:
    (1) This is a must read for those aspiring to become CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    (2) It's not something that I was aspiring to reach, but it's certainly an honor.

    Thank you in advance.

    Best regards.

    Enydia *^_^*

    ps: Is my expression, 'those sentences like the following ones', grammatical and common? If not, how to express the meaning properly?
    I assume you've misread your dictionaries, since "aspiring" can obviously precede the infinitive as you've demonstrated.

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    #6

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Hello again,
    Note I'm not a teacher,

    aspiring used as adjective :
    aspiring actor/politisian/doctor sb who is trying (has desire, hope and who acts ) to become a successful actor/politician/doctor.

    aspire to (phrasal verb)
    to have a strong desire or hope to do or have something
    He aspired to be a scientist.

    As aspire to expresses emotions I wouldn't use it in continuous form.

    Cheers

  5. enydia's Avatar

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    #7

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Thank you for your replies, teachers and friends.

    Quote Originally Posted by whitemoon View Post
    aspire to noun
    1. This is a must read for those who aspire to CEOs and for CEOs who want to be better CEOs.
    2. It's not something that I aspired to, but it's certainly an honor.

    'Aspire to noun' is of course correct, but 'aspire to do sth' is also right.
    e.g.
    (1) He aspired to be their next leader. (from Oxford dictionary)
    (2) At that time, all serious artists aspired to go to Rome. (from Longman dictionary)


    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I assume you've misread your dictionaries, since "aspiring" can obviously precede the infinitive as you've demonstrated.

    I guess that '"aspiring" can obviously precede the infinitive', since 'aspire to do sth' is grammatical; but I never found this usage or any example sentence in all my dictionaries (Oxford, Longman, Collins, and MacMillan).

    In contrast, I really found the statement 'only before noun' in dictionaries.
    The following is from Oxford dictionary:
    aspiring
    (also less frequent aspirant) adjective [only before noun]
    1 wanting to start the career or activity that is mentioned: Aspiring musicians need hours of practice every day.
    2 wanting to be successful in life: He came from an aspiring working-class background.
    The following is from Longman dictionary:
    aspiring
    ... adj [only before noun] hoping to be successful in a particular job, activity, or way of life
     aspiring young writers
     the aspiring middle classes
    So I'm not sure about the correctness of 'aspiring to do sth' and the two quoted sentences in #1, which I got through google search.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    Hello again,
    Note I'm not a teacher,

    aspiring used as adjective :
    aspiring actor/politisian/doctor sb who is trying (has desire, hope and who acts ) to become a successful actor/politician/doctor.

    aspire to (phrasal verb)
    to have a strong desire or hope to do or have something
    He aspired to be a scientist.

    As aspire to expresses emotions I wouldn't use it in continuous form.

    Cheers

    'As aspire to expresses emotions I wouldn't use it in continuous form.'
    This may be a good reason.
    But I'm sorry that I can't get your main idea.
    I think there seems to be some contradiction between your posts.

    Looking forward to any further help and discussion.

    Best regards.

    Enydia ^_^

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    #8

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    hi

    aspiring is an adjective whereas aspire to is a phrasal verb they are two different parts of speech.


    aspiring writer is somebody who aspire to be a better writer.( sb is a writer already)
    I aspire to be a writer. ( I'm not a writer I hope to be one I've started doing something to archive it)

    The only question is if aspire to( phrasal verb ) may be used in continous form.
    Like in yours example
    I was aspiring to ....

    Cheers
    Last edited by Jaskin; 15-Jul-2008 at 16:34.

  6. enydia's Avatar

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    #9

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Quote Originally Posted by Jaskin View Post
    hi

    aspiring is an adjective whereas aspire to is a phrasal verb they are two different parts of speech.


    aspiring writer is somebody who aspire to be a better writer.( sb is a writer already)
    I aspire to be a writer. ( I'm not a writer I hope to be one I've started doing something to archive it)

    The only question is if aspire to( phrasal verb ) may be used in continous form.
    Like in yours example
    I was aspiring to ....

    Cheers
    yes! That's just the question!

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: usage of 'aspiring'

    Quote Originally Posted by enydia View Post
    In contrast, I really found the statement 'only before noun' in dictionaries.
    The following is from Oxford dictionary:
    aspiring
    (also less frequent aspirant) adjective [only before noun]
    The following is from Longman dictionary:
    aspiring
    ... adj [only before noun] hoping to be successful in a
    I suspected this might be the case. What this means is that "aspiring" as an adjective can only be used before a noun, ie. attributively, not as a predicate.
    "An aspiring young actor" is a correct use as an adjective.
    "The young actor was aspiring" is not.
    For other uses of aspiring, you need to see "aspire" verb.

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